Tree Servicein Wild Dunes, SC

Let's Talk!

What Clients Say About Us

Eco-Responsible Tree Removal in Wild Dunes, SC

We have removed thousands of trees over the years. However, we never recommend tree removal if it's not warranted. Some South Carolina tree service companies tend to remove trees when they should be saved or simply pruned. Others go the opposite direction and never recommend tree removal.

Unlike other companies, our arborists make educated recommendations based on experience, your trees, and your needs. We make the right call for you - not for us. If disease, destruction of foundation, or other circumstances necessitate tree removal, rest assured we're recommending it for a reason.

Your Premier Tree Service Company in South Carolina

With years of experience, it's no wonder why so many South Carolina natives choose Palmetto Tree Service over the competition. Clients love us because we exceed expectations with a smile - no if's, and's, or but's.

Our commitment to superior service isn't a gimmick; it's a year-round promise. When you choose Palmetto Tree, you'll benefit from:

  • Professional advice and expertise
  • Seasoned, friendly, hardworking tree care experts
  • Efficient, effective tree care services
  • Competitive pricing

Ready to get started? We're ready to help! Give us a call to learn more about our tree care services and to schedule your first appointment today.

Physical-therapy-phone-number843-345-0579

Free Consultation

Latest News in Wild Dunes, SC

Wild Dunes Resort Is the Summer Vacation Spot You Need to Book Now

Everything you need for a relaxing beach vacation can be found at Wild Dunes ResortIsle of Palms is 12 miles from Charleston, SC, but it feels like a different world. With a calm stretch of beach, a charming boardwalk, and winding bike trails, it gives off the feeling of relaxation and retreat. If you want to experience the tranquility of this island hamlet, the Wild Dunes Resort includes all the perks of i...

Everything you need for a relaxing beach vacation can be found at Wild Dunes Resort

Isle of Palms is 12 miles from Charleston, SC, but it feels like a different world. With a calm stretch of beach, a charming boardwalk, and winding bike trails, it gives off the feeling of relaxation and retreat. If you want to experience the tranquility of this island hamlet, the Wild Dunes Resort includes all the perks of island life plus the bonus of having everything you need right at your fingertips. With world-class dining, several lodging options, and plenty of activities to keep the kids busy, this sprawling resort is the perfect location for families looking for a low-key beach experience.

How to Plan Your Vacation at Wild Dunes Resort

Gabby Cullen

The best part about Wild Dunes is that you can select lodging that’s perfect for your group. There are several options from which to choose. If you want an incredible concierge service, The Sweetgrass Inn, which opened in 2021, offers charming rooms, a spa, and several dining options. For larger groups and more space, check out the Residences at Sweetgrass. Located right above the Sweetgrass Plaza, you can choose from one-to three-room furnished rentals with all the hotel perks. For more privacy, Wild Dunes also offers private rental homes and condos.

Plan your itinerary

Gabby Cullen

Whether you come to Wild Dunes during the off-season or the busy months, there’s plenty to keep you and your family entertained.

The PoolsKids will want to spend plenty of time in the pools. The Sweetgrass Inn Pools (they’re heated!) are the shining gem in the middle of the resort, with a zero-entry pool, a splash pad, and poolside Island Adventure programs. There is even live music by the firepit in the summer.

The Grand Pavilion offers two stunning beachside pools; it’s where you’ll find Beachside Burgers. If you want to swim laps or join in on the family friendly games and recreation happening in the warmer months, head for The Swim Center Pool.

The BeachOf course, the Isle of Palm beach is the main attraction for good reason. Wide, sandy beaches, mellow waves perfect for kids, and stunning beach homes to admire, it’ll be easy to spend all day enjoying the sun and surf. Wild Dunes has direct access to the beach, and they offer beach chair and umbrella rentals for guests.

The ActivitiesThere is so much going on at Wild Dunes! It’ll be tricky to find time to fit in all the fun like Sunday S’mores, Bingo Night, Minute to Win It Game Night, Dive-In Movie Night, Family Movie Night, a sunset sandcastle contest, guided beach walks, poolside crafts, and much more. Many of these events are complimentary, but some require reservations and a fee, so be sure to check. If you want to see the resort by bike, there are rentals available daily, including tandem bikes for parents with little kids.

If you feel like relaxing, there are many places to do just that! Enjoy the swinging hammock chairs at Sweetgrass Inn, the Adirondack chairs in Sweetgrass Plaza, and the beach and pool loungers just about anywhere.

Decide where you want to eat

Gabby Cullen

Charleston is known for its world-class cuisine, and Isle of Palms lives up to the hype. Guests of Wild Dunes have access to all the restaurants on the property; the biggest challenge might be deciding where to go.

For breakfast, if you’re in the mood for something quick, head to Woody’s, where they serve all-day breakfast (this spot has many options for kids!). Wander into Hudson’s Market & Cafe and order a gourmet breakfast sandwich while stocking up on beach snacks and drinks. For something upscale, head for Coastal Provisions, where you’ll choose between fluffy pancakes, french toast, omelets, and plenty of sides like biscuits, bacon, mixed berries, and breakfast potatoes.

At lunchtime, the world is your culinary oyster! The Laughing Gull, located by the Sweetgrass Inn pools, has Caribbean-inspired fare like the must-try conch fritters, the Cuban sandwich, and chicken tenders for little ones. Beachside Burgers (open in the warm months) offers delicious burgers, fries, soft pretzels, popcorn shrimp, and more. If you’re looking for tacos, stop by the vintage airstream trailer in Sweetgrass Plaza. Choose from Carne Asada, Chicken Tinga, or even vegetarian options.

When it comes time for dinner, save one night for Coastal Crust. Offering Neopolitan-style pies made with locally-sourced ingredients, this will be a family favorite. If fine dining is what you want, Coastal Provisions is ideal. Chef Thalita Smith consistently presents a delectable seasonal-infused menu of seafood and chops. Her salads are a must-try, as are the beef and seafood dishes.

Things to Do Nearby

If you want to venture out of Wild Dunes resort, there are plenty of places to go and things to do.

Head to CharlestonThis cultural city is a mere 30-minute drive from the Isle of Palms. Spend some time admiring the historical homes, take a carriage ride, hit up the playground near Rainbow Row, take a wildlife cruise, or visit the Children’s Museum of the Lowcountry!

Visit the South Carolina Aquarium or the Center for Birds of PreyWhether they love sea life or the Lowcountry habitat, there’s a place for your little naturalists. The Sea Turtle Care Center at the aquarium is especially fun for budding conservationists.

Check out Shem Creek & BoardwalkThis waterfront area in Mount Pleasant is over two thousand feet long and offers panoramic views of Charleston Harbor, Fort Sumter, and Castle Pinckney.

Wild Dunes Zoning Ordinances In Isle Of Palms City Council’s Control

By Brian Sherman for The Island Eye NewsThe Isle of Palms Planning Commission has recommended that the IOP City Council proceed with the second and final reading of five ordinances aimed at limiting development in Wild Dunes. It was obvious at the Nov. 9 meeting that not all members of the Planning Commission were in agreement concerning proposed measures that would amend a planned residential development ordinance approved in 1975 which gave the developer the authority to build 350 hotel rooms and nearly 2,500 residential units....

By Brian Sherman for The Island Eye News

The Isle of Palms Planning Commission has recommended that the IOP City Council proceed with the second and final reading of five ordinances aimed at limiting development in Wild Dunes. It was obvious at the Nov. 9 meeting that not all members of the Planning Commission were in agreement concerning proposed measures that would amend a planned residential development ordinance approved in 1975 which gave the developer the authority to build 350 hotel rooms and nearly 2,500 residential units.

However, when it came time to vote, the seven member Commission agreed unanimously to send the ordinances back to the Council, which was scheduled to address the issue at its Nov. 15 meeting.

The ordinances, according to Director of Planning and Zoning Douglas Kerr, would limit development in Wild Dunes to its current level and would establish a new conservation/recreation zoning district that would include golf and tennis facilities and also could be used for outdoor recreation, public utility lines and city-sponsored activities and events. At the Planning Commission meeting, the only opposition to the ordinances came from Planning Commission member Sandy Stone, who asked if it was necessary for the Council to quickly pass the measures on second reading. He compared the situation to the South Carolina Department of Transportation re-striping the IOP Connector without input from the city and Council’s decision to transfer the leases at the Marina. “The amended zoning ordinance, to me, has been fast-tracked, and, in some instances, I feel like it’s been forced on us without a whole lot of presentation of facts and no discussion on the part of the parties involved,” Stone said. “I don’t feel good about the way that this thing has moved, the speed at which it’s moved, and I don’t see the urgency or the need to make a snap decision to accept all of these right away,” Stone added.

“I don’t think we’re taking away any rights here,” Planning Commission member Suzanne Nagelski responded. “All these ordinances are saying is that they have to submit and apply for rezoning.” “We’re basically hitting the bear down there with a twoby-four and saying no, no, no,” Stone said. “I don’t know what the implications of all this is and it concerns me. I’m suggesting we take some time, allow City Council and the powers that be at Wild Dunes to meet and talk and work this thing through. What’s the harm?” “I think the harm is not so much in the ordinances but from what people have been speaking out loud and clearly,” Nagelski answered.

“They’re looking at us to give them some sort of affirmation. I think waiting beyond 30 days is unreasonable.” “The ordinances we’re looking at fall within the comp plan that we’re doing. There’s not one portion of it that doesn’t fit into our objectives and goals. It’s consistent with the resiliency plan we’re working on, too,” Nagelski added. After Stone suggested that the city meet with the developers of Wild Dunes, Planning Commission member Steve Corney pointed out that it’s not the Commission’s job to ask the Council to negotiate with the developers, and Kerr agreed. “We as a Planning Commission aren’t being asked to say we want you to negotiate, Council,” Corney said. “If we make recommendations, that doesn’t mean they’re approved. They can take that recommendation and say now we as a Council want to negotiate. Personally, I don’t want them to do that. But our role here is to look at these five and move them forward.” “Our role is to look at this from a technical planning point of view and give a thumbs up or thumbs down for a second reading,” Corney added. Responding to a question from Stone, Kerr pointed out that the developers did not speak publicly at any Council meetings or at either of the two public hearings on the subject and that they haven’t submitted any plans to build additional hotels or housing units in Wild Dunes.

“We have reached out to them and informed them about what’s happening,” Kerr said. “We know that they clearly are watching the process. They are aware of what’s going on.”

As rising seas flood Charleston's fairways, its municipal golf course leads in adapting

Alanna Elder (Climate Central) contributed data reportingAs the Charleston Municipal golf course's holes along the Stono River began flooding with high tides, Troy Miller, the course’s architect, could see something had to change. The turf was almost always wet enough to make for soggy swings, at best, and awash in seawater at worst.“When we had high tides, they had to close the golf holes because there was actually standing water across those holes and they were impassable,” Miller said.In 201...

Alanna Elder (Climate Central) contributed data reporting

As the Charleston Municipal golf course's holes along the Stono River began flooding with high tides, Troy Miller, the course’s architect, could see something had to change. The turf was almost always wet enough to make for soggy swings, at best, and awash in seawater at worst.

“When we had high tides, they had to close the golf holes because there was actually standing water across those holes and they were impassable,” Miller said.

In 2018, the back nine was unplayable for more than half of July. There was no holding back the sea or stopping the thunderstorms, so course managers decided to give the water somewhere to go instead. They dug ponds for stormwater to drain into and used earth excavated from those ponds to raise holes that sidle up to the river.

“The renovation made the biggest difference in the world,” said Billy Wise, who has been golfing there since he was a kid and still tries to go three times a week—a habit made harder when the course started closing several times a month for flooding. “It’s a gem now. People can’t wait to get in and play this course.”

Links golf courses, designed to enjoy seaside views, undulating terrain over the dunes, and a fine texture and tight turf from the sandy soil and indigenous grasses along coastal South Carolina, face grim prospects with rising sea levels, more intense rainstorms, and slower moving hurricanes.

As pollution levels in the atmosphere continue to increase and seas rise and rainfall intensifies, the renovations to Charleston Municipal offer a case study in how to buy precious decades in protecting a vulnerable coastal golf course from the effects of climate change.

A Climate Central analysis combining elevation data with the latest sea level rise projections shows parts of some courses in Charleston are already vulnerable to yearly coastal flooding, with those vulnerable areas projected to expand rapidly through 2050. The implications reach major tourism industries for coastal communities, as well as quality of life and components of golfing history. Course managers have faced the choice to adapt, or suffer.

“In the Lowcountry, golf courses have an issue and that’s that part of what we like with our golf courses is we like them to be near marshes and we like them to have these beautiful kinds of vistas around them,” said Norman S. Levine, professor of geology and environmental geosciences at the College of Charleston. “Sea level rise will affect them and they’ll have to look at how their course is designed in order to make sure that they can stay—pardon the pun—above water.”

Problems ahead for those courses, Levine said, could include coastal erosion, hurricanes, more frequent and stronger storms, and rising tides.

“We’re already seeing these changes,” he said. The Santee Cooper GIS Laboratory and Lowcountry Hazards Center, which Levine directs, has tracked flooding increasing from 20 or 25 days a year to 60 to 89 days a year.

“That’s flooding that may be on roads, it’s flooding that’s on the edges of places, and that’s going to continue,” Levine said. The November day of his interview, he said, was an example: an extremely high tide met with a storm system that pushed water higher.

“We have more and more of these days where we’re looking at full marshes, and when you have a full marsh, that means that saltwater wedges further in,” he said. By what timeline, and how bad it’ll be this season, depends on the storm season itself, and whether these effects continue to accelerate, threatening to flood communities and businesses.

“Charleston is one of the world’s eight most vulnerable cities or regions to sea level rise and so that’s going to affect our courses in this area,” Levine said. “We are the ‘Lowcountry’ for a reason.”

GOLFING IN THE LOWCOUNTRY

Sea level projections for Patriots Point Links show spots of occasional flood risk in the next decade, and more frequent flooding by 2050. Managers there agree flooding has not been a problem. Rising tides have brought a little water onto the 18th hole’s rough, but don’t seem to have substantially affected the course, Brad Parker, general manager for Patriot Point Links, said via email. Future renovations could raise that area and the island green on the 17th hole.

Kiawah Island Golf Resort includes 10 holes on sand dunes, providing golfers there with among the most seaside holes of any course in the Northern Hemisphere. That provides for spectacular PGA Championships, the most recent in 2021. Tourists travel from all over the world to test themselves on the ocean course, considered one of the most difficult in North America. That exposure means the course has historically been hammered by storms, and repeatedly rebuilt.

After significant flooding in three consecutive years, Kiawah Island published a report in 2018 on the problems building as flooding worsens, and strategies to adapt. The report details how in early 2017 sand berms and dunes already shrunk by Hurricane Matthew were cut into again by Tropical Storm Irma.

Areas of the golf course reached what the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control’s Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management considered “emergency condition.” Other areas were deemed insufficiently setback from the high-tide line.

The town replenished dunes along those areas—pouring more sand there to slow erosion. (An evaluation of the roads and infrastructure mentioned roads could be modified to serve as auxiliary water storage and drainage basins; KICA and the Resort might even consider allowing parts of the golf course to serve that function, the report added: “There will be no golf on the island anyway until the excess water is drained and the island is back to normal operation.”)

Some portions of the course are already at chronic flood risk, expected to be inundated at least once a year on average. As seas continue to rise, the risks will swell and by 2100, unless emissions of heat-trapping emissions are reined in, most of the course's interior is expected to be at risk of chronic flooding.

Wild Dunes was built on the dunes for which it is named, but next to marsh that will impinge on the edges, Levine said. Climate Central's analysis shows coastal flood risks expanded beyond the riverfront to threaten beachfront and interior holes during the coming decades. Wild Dunes and Kiawah Island course representatives declined to comment for this story.

“[In the] ’80s and ’90s, it started getting worse where we get a king tide or if we had a storm, you shut the course down for a week at least, and that translates into lost money,” Wise, the local golfer, said.

Wise learned to game not just the course, but the weather. He watched for big thunderstorms that could close the back nine on the municipal course; he could tell, just driving in, whether the course was going to be underwater based on how dry the fairway on the ninth hole looked.

Then the course, which was built in 1929, was renovated with rising tides and stormwater runoff in mind. Some places were lifted 18 inches and others up to 7 feet and the reshaped course opened in 2020.

WET COURSES ARE LESS FUN

Fast and firm condition of golf course fairways and greens are “what makes golf fun,” Miller said, and that’s what they’re seeing more of now at the municipal course.

“Now the ball does bounce and roll and it allows you to use the contours of the ground and it just creates a better playing condition and a better surface for players...which has made more people want to play the course,” Miller said.

When Hurricane Ian dropped 8 inches of rain on the golf course, the course’s new stormwater basins even helped to drain surrounding neighborhoods and homes, then quickly dried. The course was open again in a day.

“It operated exactly how we had engineered it to and just shows the opportunity to use these green spaces to combat flooding in other parts of the city,” Miller said.

He came out to watch how the course handled an unusually high tide on a sunny day last October when an 8.47-foot tide, the fifth highest ever, came in. The water rolled up to but then back from the fairway without saltwater encroaching, which can kill grass. The course never needed to close.

“Which was just a huge rewarding experience to be able to see that what you are doing has been done correctly and understanding that we are building for the future and trying to create the integrity of this golf course for generations to come,” he said.

And those generations could be looking at protecting against not just 8.5- but 9.5- or even 10-foot tides.

“It’s not going to get any cheaper to do this work and addressing it today will pay in the short term and certainly in the long haul,” Miller said.

Waves rolling in higher won’t be the only problem, Levine points out. As sea level rises, the groundwater will also become more saline, which can make it harder for grasses and trees on the course to survive. The whole groundwater table can also rise, he adds, which can affect how it feels to play the course, or kill the trees screening one hole from the next.

Flooding alone presents a problem for golf course turf, said Cole Thompson, who works on the USGA’s green section research team, and those problems are compounded with seawater. They start with submerging plants made to live on land, and end with sediment piling up that, over time, affects how that course plays. Plants respond to seawater like they’ve just been hit with a drought—and it’ll look brown or straw-colored, or wilted. Even when that water dries, it leaves behind a salty residue in soils.

The U.S. Golf Association has been tracking the effects on turf from drought, heat, and seawater. Grass is good for sports with heavy traffic precisely because it does regrow, but with these flood-associated problems, it struggles.

“After a while, you’re going to have turf that’s just not recovering,” Thompson said. “Probably one-sixteenth of the amount of salinity in seawater would be problematic for most plants—so it doesn’t take much.”

With the last of those problematic forces in mind, the association has supported the development of more salt-resistant grasses, like seashore paspalum. Replanted over fairways, it can survive periodic ocean flooding.

But closing to re-turf holes are among the time-consuming and expensive changes courses might face. That, like flooding, comes at a cost: Wise said, “you shut the course down for a week at least and that translates into lost money as far as money coming into the course.”

SC finishes sea turtle nesting season with record-breaking inventory

Slowly but surely, sea turtles are making strides in South Carolina.Nesting season wrapped up Oct. 31, and the state finished with 8,002 nests — its second-highest total on record.Nest counts have averaged about 5,600 the past two years, but the S.C. Department of Natural Resources said it is not usual for record-breaking years to follow low nesting years.For example, the 8,795 nests counted in 2019 were more than triple the 2,766 reported in 2018.As numbers across the Southeast trend upward, biologists are ...

Slowly but surely, sea turtles are making strides in South Carolina.

Nesting season wrapped up Oct. 31, and the state finished with 8,002 nests — its second-highest total on record.

Nest counts have averaged about 5,600 the past two years, but the S.C. Department of Natural Resources said it is not usual for record-breaking years to follow low nesting years.

For example, the 8,795 nests counted in 2019 were more than triple the 2,766 reported in 2018.

As numbers across the Southeast trend upward, biologists are optimistic the reptiles are beginning to recover.

“Increased nest counts since the mid- to late-2000s show promise for the loggerhead,” said Michelle Pate, nesting program leader for DNR. “We’re seeing the continued benefits of conservation measured enacted decades ago as well as those management techniques still used today.”

Among the most interesting finds this season was the oddity of a leucistic sea turtle on Folly Beach. While most loggerhead turtles are dark, leucistic animals are white, pale or patchy in color because of their reduced pigmentation.

Dave Miller, the permit holder for the Folly Beach Turtle Team, found the special turtle in September.

“I saw these two turtles coming out of the nest and they were covered with sand,” Miller said. “And then the wave washed them over and one of them was white. I didn’t realize it when it was covered in sand.”

Leucism increases animals’ chances of being taken by predators. And in areas like Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island, coyotes are among the top predators for sea turtles.

Turtle patrol volunteers work to find sea turtle nests on beaches before coyotes do.

“What the Wild Dunes coyotes have learned to do is ambush the turtle as she comes out of the water in the middle of the night and begins to lay her eggs,” said Mary Pringle, a project leader for the Island Turtle Team in Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island.

The coyotes will often eat the turtle’s eggs before volunteers can get to them in the morning and place plastic screens over the nests. The animals can’t destroy the nests once that happens. But volunteers can’t predict when and where a turtle will choose to nest.

“When I started (volunteering), we didn’t have any coyotes,” Pringle said. “We had raccoons and ghost crabs as predators, but not coyotes. And it’s just something that’s happening all over the coast.”

Foxes and the emergence of armadillos on beaches have also become a reason for nest losses in the state.

Pate said other concerns include artificial lighting on heavily populated beaches, and people intercepting nesting females at night.

Even with predators like coyotes, sea turtle species in the state have found a way to prevail. Many new turtles nested here for the first time this season.

“And they (scientists) are cautiously optimistic that it will continue because of nest protection efforts — saving nests, making sure they hatch like we did and all the other people who do the same thing that we do for DNR,” Pringle said.

Pringle’s Island Turtle Team is one of about 30 groups along the coast that patrol beaches from May 1 to Oct. 31 to count, monitor and protect the nests. DNR said there are more than 1,500 volunteers coastwide.

Fifty-seven total nests were spotted this year on the Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island. And 4,602 turtles hatched on those islands.

Most of the nests there were in the Wild Dunes area.

Thirty-four nests were were counted on Myrtle Beach; 99 on Folly Beach; 483 on Kiawah Island; 351 at Edisto Beach State Park; and 423 on Hilton Head Island, according to data.

Loggerheads nest on the state’s shores more often than any other species, but greens, Kemp’s ridleys and leatherbacks also have a presence here.

Each species is classified as endangered or threatened and receive protections under the Endangered Species Acts. Extra state protections are also in place.

This year, 7,974 nests were counted in the state, 21 green turtle nests and one Kemp’s ridley nest.

Green turtles and Kemp’s ridleys are primarily found in other regions of North America, including Florida and the western Gulf of Mexico.

“I think in the history of Folly Beach Turtle Team, we’ve had maybe two leatherbacks,” Miller said. “And everything else has been loggerheads.”

Other species will pop up on the beach, maybe for food, but choose to nest in other locations.

DNR said beachgoers can help the state’s sea turtles by keeping beaches clean, giving the animals and their nests space and turning beachfront lights out to avoid disorienting them during nesting season.

10 South Carolina Beaches Worth Visiting In The Winter (Over Summer)

South Carolina is known for its miles of spectacular coastline and parade of beach town destinations that are perfect for summer getaways. However, once the temperatures drop and the hordes of summer crowds depart, these beautiful beaches transform into off-season retreats that still offer intrepid travelers plenty to see, do, and experience. The following are some of SC’s absolute best beaches for the ultimate idyllic winte...

South Carolina is known for its miles of spectacular coastline and parade of beach town destinations that are perfect for summer getaways. However, once the temperatures drop and the hordes of summer crowds depart, these beautiful beaches transform into off-season retreats that still offer intrepid travelers plenty to see, do, and experience. The following are some of SC’s absolute best beaches for the ultimate idyllic winter vacation full of sun, sand, and off-season adventure.

Hilton Head

Known as “America’s Favorite Island,” Hilton Head is so much more than one of South Carolina’s most visited summer beach towns; it’s also a lovely escape in the off-season for those looking for year-round beachy vibes. And with an average daytime temperature in the low-to-mid 60s, the weather is just balmy enough to still enjoy (most) of HH’s most popular outdoor activities—without the summer crowds.

Folly Beach

The popular Folly Beach is just minutes from downtown Charleston, making it an ideal spot to take a winter break. Temperatures in the 60s throughout make for cooler days that are still perfect for Low Country exploring, while nearby Charleston has a number of fun winter activities that are just a stone’s throw away from Folly Beach’s laidback vibes and picturesque beauty.

Myrtle Beach

Myrtle Beach is undoubtedly one of South Carolina’s top-rated beaches throughout the summer—but in the off-season, the beautiful beach town is still a bustling hub of activities and events that make it a wow-worthy winter destination, too. And while it may be too cool to take a dip, MB’s outdoor scenery is just as lovely as it is in the summer.

Kiawah Island

Kiawah Island is a secluded beach town escape whose year-round laidback vibes make it the perfect place to visit in winter’s cooler months. Undoubtedly, one of the best reasons to visit Kiawah is its relaxing atmosphere—made even better by the lack of summer crowds—but there are still plenty of outdoor activities and recreation on tap for outdoor enthusiasts, too.

Isle Of Palms

Isle of Palms may be known for its stellar summer recreation; however, this Charleston area beach is so much more than a warm weather retreat. Throughout the off-season, this picturesque SC beach’s tranquil (and mostly crowd-free!) vibes become the perfect getaway for those looking for a beachfront vacay with plenty to see and do during the cool(er) winter months.

Sullivan’s Island

A neighbor to Isle of Palms located at the mouth of the lovely Charleston harbor, Sullivan’s Island is the perfect mix of small-town charm and relaxing, beachside fun. Home to beautiful beaches, outdoor adventures, and nearby activities galore, Sullivan’s Island is the perfect winter getaway.

Pawley’s Island

Known as one of America’s oldest and best summer resort communities, Pawley’s Island may seem like an exclusively warm weather destination. However, when the summer crowds leave, there are still plenty of things to see and do in this historic SC beach town.

Murrells Inlet

A popular fishing village near Myrtle Beach, Murrells Inlet is packed with charm, history, and wonderful waterfront scenery that make it a gorgeous year-round getaway. From pirate lore to oodles of outdoor recreation, SC’s “seafood capital” is a fun-filled winter retreat.

Litchfield Beach

Well known for its pristine white sand and turquoise waters that make for an idyllic summer retreat, Litchfield Beach is no less beautiful during the cool(er) winter months. Come for the activities like fishing and biking, but stay for the relaxing, scenic vibes available year-round.

Surfside Beach

Located near Myrtle Beach, the spectacularly scenic Surfside Beach is known as a popular family-friendly destination throughout the summer. However, there’s plenty to do here during the off-season, too, for those looking to escape the warm weather crowds.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.