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We have removed thousands of trees over the years. However, we never recommend tree removal if it's not warranted. Some South Carolina tree service companies tend to remove trees when they should be saved or simply pruned. Others go the opposite direction and never recommend tree removal.

Unlike other companies, our arborists make educated recommendations based on experience, your trees, and your needs. We make the right call for you - not for us. If disease, destruction of foundation, or other circumstances necessitate tree removal, rest assured we're recommending it for a reason.

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With years of experience, it's no wonder why so many South Carolina natives choose Palmetto Tree Service over the competition. Clients love us because we exceed expectations with a smile - no if's, and's, or but's.

Our commitment to superior service isn't a gimmick; it's a year-round promise. When you choose Palmetto Tree, you'll benefit from:

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Five Stunning Ecotourism-Focused Hotels On The Carolina Coast

While the twin states of North and South Carolina are equipped with bustling cities like Charleston, Charlotte, and Raleigh, one of the most admirable attributes of the entire region is its sprawling shoreline. From Daufuskie Island to the Outer Banks, there’s no shortage of pristine forests, steaming swamps, and picturesque beaches to explore all across the coast—and these natural wonders come complete with top-tier accommodations right nearby.As you plan your next foray into the wilderness of the Carolinas, these charmin...

While the twin states of North and South Carolina are equipped with bustling cities like Charleston, Charlotte, and Raleigh, one of the most admirable attributes of the entire region is its sprawling shoreline. From Daufuskie Island to the Outer Banks, there’s no shortage of pristine forests, steaming swamps, and picturesque beaches to explore all across the coast—and these natural wonders come complete with top-tier accommodations right nearby.

As you plan your next foray into the wilderness of the Carolinas, these charming properties are perfect for getting up-close-and-personal with some of the region’s most fascinating flora and fauna.

With more than 1,500 acres of surrounding wilderness to explore, Wild Dunes Resort serves as the perfect base for immersing oneself in the natural beauty of South Carolina. While the property is perfect for sunbathing and swimming, true ecotourism aficionados should be sure to book an excursion to Capers Island, a pristine barrier island located just east of Isle of Palms. Upon arrival, guests will embark on a wildlife safari that offers the opportunity to spot ospreys, bald eagles, and even bottlenose dolphins, followed by a trip to Capers Island’s pristine Boneyard Beach, a stretch of shoreline that’s home to large swathes of petrified driftwood.

Located just south of downtown Bluffton, the Montage Palmetto Bluff is a shining example of how to offer first-rate hospitality while existing in harmony with the surrounding wilderness. With 20,000 acres of Carolina Lowcountry to explore across Palmetto Bluff, non-human residents include alligators, white-tailed deer, bobcats, and a massive array of native birds and insects—all of which can be discovered during a kayak excursion or while trekking along one of the area’s many hiking trails. As an added bonus, guests with a serious passion for wildlife are welcome to attend a lecture or join a research expedition with PhD-level staff at the Palmetto Bluff Conservancy, an organization focused on preserving the biodiversity of the Palmetto Bluff community.

Planning an outdoor adventure-focused getaway on North Carolina’s idyllic Outer Banks? Look no further than Sanderling Resort, a palatial property located on the coast of Duck. Beach access, a full-service spa, and three on-property pools are just a few of the plush amenities awaiting guests, but for a truly memorable stay, a foray into the wilderness is an absolutely essential activity. Equipped with a diverse array of excursions focused on land, sea, and air, visitors are welcome to soar above sand dunes on a hang gliding tour, spot the Outer Banks’ famous wild horses on a beach safari, or cruise along the coast in search of bottlenose dolphins.

North Carolina’s Crystal Coast is renowned for its abundant natural beauty, and few properties are as dedicated to preserving it as the Beaufort Hotel. Sustainability is a guiding principle on the property, with initiatives focusing on water conservation, LEED certification, and single-use plastic reduction in place to keep local wildlife safe—and this steadfast commitment to the environment has spurred massive potential for ecotourism in the surrounding area. Just south of the property, the sprawling Rachel Carson Reserve is a paradise for visiting wildlife enthusiasts, equipped with native shorebirds, river otters, sea turtles, and even wild horses.

Officially chartered in 1705, the tiny town of Bath is one of North Carolina’s most underrated historic gems—and the idyllic Inn On Bath Creek serves as the perfect base for exploring the area. Each morning, guests can look forward to a hearty three-course breakfast, then head into town to grab a kayak and set off to explore the region. During the winter months, the nearby Lake Mattamuskeet offers a wealth of migrating waterfowl ranging from snow geese to tundra swans, while Goose Creek State Park is a top-tier destination for basking in the idyllic beauty of The Tar Heel State’s native cypress swamps.

The 10 Best Resorts in South Carolina

As far as T+L readers are concerned, the combination of charming small towns and white sand beaches makes South Carolina...

As far as T+L readers are concerned, the combination of charming small towns and white sand beaches makes South Carolina a great choice for a family vacation. And whether the destination is Myrtle Beach, Hilton Head, or Kiawah Island, travelers are sure to find plenty of activities — from golf to tennis to paddleboarding to fishing and more.

Every year for our World's Best Awards survey, T+L asks readers to weigh in on travel experiences around the globe — to share their opinions on the top hotels, resorts, cities, islands, cruise ships, spas, airlines, and more. Hotels (including safari lodges) were rated on their facilities, location, service, food, and overall value. Properties were classified as city hotel, resort, or safari lodge based on their locations and amenities.

Of the 10 South Carolina resorts on this year's list, nine are repeat honorees from last year. T+L readers seem to enjoy returning to their favorite places again and again — one voter's family has journeyed to the No. 7 Westin Hilton Head for 12 years. Another visitor called No. 6 Wild Dunes Resort — which has private condos, house rentals, and hotel rooms and suites — "a perfect beach getaway with outstanding service and amenities."

Many of the state's top-ranked resorts are located along the Atlantic coast. In fact, the one non-coastal resort that made the list is the No. 4 Willcox, located on the state's western edge, in Aiken. "All-around great hotel in a beautiful setting on the edge of the Hitchcock Woods," noted one reader.

Once again, the Sanctuary at Kiawah Island Golf Resort claimed the top spot. Find out why — and which other resorts made it onto the list of best South Carolina resorts.

1. The Sanctuary at Kiawah Island Golf Resort, Kiawah Island

As the No. 1 resort for the second year in a row, the Sanctuary hits all the right notes, according to T+L readers. Many praised the impressive grounds, outstanding hospitality, robust fitness facilities (including golf and tennis), and flavorful Lowcountry cuisine at Jasmine Porch. And while the beaches are a big draw in summer, some guests noted that the winter season is just as special. "The Sanctuary goes all out at Christmas," said one visitor. "There's a huge tree in the lobby and one outside on the green leading to the ocean. There is also a chef's creation out of chocolate; this year they made a chocolate train."

Score: 92.46

2. The Beach Club at Charleston Harbor Resort & Marina, Mount Pleasant

Score: 91.24

3. Montage Palmetto Bluff, Bluffton

Score: 90.31

4. The Willcox, Aiken

Score: 89.64

5. The Inn & Club at Harbour Town, Hilton Head Island

Score: 86.48

6. Wild Dunes Resort, Isle of Palms

Score: 86.00

7. The Westin Hilton Head Island Resort & Spa, Hilton Head Island

Score: 84.80

8. Disney's Hilton Head Island Resort, Hilton Head Island

Score: 81.86

9. Marriott Myrtle Beach Resort & Spa at Grande Dunes, Myrtle Beach

Score: 81.31

More information: marriott.com

10. Omni Hilton Head Oceanfront Resort, Hilton Head Island

Score: 79.86

Chefs showcase lionfish cooking techniques at SC Aquarium JuLionfish Festival

Derick Wade of The Darling Oyster Bar admits he was a little freaked out the first time he cooked red lionfish, a large venomous and predatory species roaming the Atlantic Ocean near the South Carolina coast.At the time, Wade was working at the Kiawah Island Golf Resort where serving sustainable seafood was made a priority, like it is today at the King Street restaurant where he serves as executive chef. After breaking down that first lionfish, Wade realized the endeavor was similar to working with swordfish or grouper — as long...

Derick Wade of The Darling Oyster Bar admits he was a little freaked out the first time he cooked red lionfish, a large venomous and predatory species roaming the Atlantic Ocean near the South Carolina coast.

At the time, Wade was working at the Kiawah Island Golf Resort where serving sustainable seafood was made a priority, like it is today at the King Street restaurant where he serves as executive chef. After breaking down that first lionfish, Wade realized the endeavor was similar to working with swordfish or grouper — as long as he wore gloves to avoid getting pricked by one of its venomous spines.

Pan-searing the fish in butter, Wade was pleasantly surprised by its flavor, which he described as a mix between lobster and shrimp. The Wisconsin native was even more drawn to cooking with lionfish when he realized what it could do for South Carolina fisheries.

Lionfish feed on herbivores, small fish that eat algae from coral reefs. Their presence not only damages the coral reefs that are already impacted by pollution and climate change, it decreases available food sources for snappers, groupers and other fish that show up on restaurant menus and also feed on these fish.

“Immediately, lionfish are going to be in direct competition with the food sources for snapper and grouper,” said Arnold Postell, dive safety officer and curator of large exhibits at the South Carolina Aquarium. “The lionfish are going to decimate those populations.”

Postell first learned about lionfish at a Florida seminar about five years ago. He was shocked and discouraged to learn that lionfish — more prevalent along the Florida coastline where the water stays warm year-round — were swimming up to South Carolina waters.

“It all seemed very doom and gloom, so it never became a primary focus,” said Postell, who started studying lionfish as the Aquarium launched its reef research program. “In the end, the overall message was actually our efforts can make a difference.”

That’s where the JuLionfish Festival comes in. Throughout July, divers have been competing to catch as many lionfish as possible, with the campaign culminating in a July 29 event featuring lionfish tastings and cooking demonstrations.

Austin Blake (Oystercatcher Restaurant & Bar at Wild Dunes Resort), Shaun Brian (CudaCo.), Lucas Owens (Julep in Greenville), Steven Goff (Tastee Diner in Asheville, N.C.), Wade and a to-be-determined chef from 167 Raw will participate at the festival, open to those who pay $65 for an all-inclusive ticket. The Darling chef will serve a lionfish taco, smoking the flakey white fish before finishing it in the pan.

While the derby and festival are raising awareness for the need to rein in the state’s lionfish population, diners shouldn’t expect to see this fish on menus across the Lowcountry. Not yet, at least.

Lionfish can be caught with a snorkel, spear and net in shallow water, but diving gear is required to catch them in deeper dwellings. Beyond the skill it takes to catch the fish, some seafood purveyors hesitate to work with them, given the venomous spikes that could injure handlers.

Wade has served lionfish several times at The Darling, and he plans to incorporate it into his menu more in the future. His chefs wear metal, cut-resistant gloves when breaking it down, exercising caution throughout the process.

Getting cut by one of the spines lining its fins is the only way a lionfish can harm you. If properly cleaned, the fish could be eaten raw and is often served in ceviche.

“We’re big advocates for all the sustainable fishing,” Wade said. “We put heavy pressure on certain fish because of what people know. You want to carry the local fish, but sometimes that translates into certain fish getting overfished.”

What it means to serve sustainable seafood can be confusing at times, but the mantra championed by local chefs is cut and dry when it comes to lionfish.

More lionfish on restaurant plates is a win-win for everybody.

New ‘No Toys Left Behind Bin’ on IOP encourages everyone to keep beach clean

A sandcastle is evidence of a day well spent on the beach. Plastic shovels and buckets are commonplace on the Isle of Palms as children collaborate to create the perfect sand sculptures. But when the time comes to leave the beach, the tools that brought an afternoon of small-scale seaside construction are often left on the shore in a hurry to pack up and get home.The Isle of Palms Cleanup Crew and the City of Isle of Palms teamed up to introduce a playful solution to coastal pollution by creating an official “No Toys Left Behind...

A sandcastle is evidence of a day well spent on the beach. Plastic shovels and buckets are commonplace on the Isle of Palms as children collaborate to create the perfect sand sculptures. But when the time comes to leave the beach, the tools that brought an afternoon of small-scale seaside construction are often left on the shore in a hurry to pack up and get home.

The Isle of Palms Cleanup Crew and the City of Isle of Palms teamed up to introduce a playful solution to coastal pollution by creating an official “No Toys Left Behind Bin” at Front Beach. The No Toys Left Behind Bin is located in a nook alongside the public beach access in the 1100 block of Palm Boulevard, between the outdoor showers and Coconut Joe’s.

The toy bin is a place for anyone who finds forgotten toys on the beach to add them to the bin so they can be shared and reused by more families — with the expectation that they won’t be left behind on the beach again.

Susan Hill Smith, a co-founder of the IOP Cleanup Crew, said that the crew has seen a large volume of toys left behind on the beaches during their weekly litter sweeps. They wanted a place to put intact toys so they don’t end up in the trash or swept out to sea.

“There’s a real potential for them to become pollution. And for them to be washed into the ocean. And then where they can become harmful to wildlife and even get broken up into microplastics which are also another issue that we are concerned about,” Smith said.

“The City is glad to see Isle of Palms Cleanup Crew use the space as a focal point for their litter sweeps and other conservation initiatives,” City Administrator Desiree Fragoso said. “The new toy bin is an excellent example of our collaboration and a fun addition to Front Beach as we all work together to keep the coast clean.”

In 2021, IOP Cleanup Crew’s volunteers, along with other individuals and groups collectively picked up more than 1,200 toys from the Isle of Palms beach, which they documented with the South Carolina Aquarium’s Litter-Free Digital Journal.

Sarah Daniel Parker walks the beach every morning and has been doing so for years. She started collecting left-behind toys after seeing how many toys litter the beaches. Parker said she picks up no less than a dozen forgotten beach toys on her walks.

“The volume of toys that people leave behind, it’s abysmal. I mean, it’s so disturbing to know that all people do is they ... just get this huge bundle of toys and because they’re so cheap, I guess they just leave them right where they were. They just walk away and all the toys are still there,” Parker said.

The idea for the toy bin came from a similar effort at the Wild Dunes Resort and community beach. It is part of a trend that other coastal communities, including Folly Beach and Tybee Island, Georgia, have adopted as they grapple with an overwhelming number of forgotten beach toys that can quickly turn into litter and trash.

The No Toys Left Behind bin offers a place for Parker and other litter collectors to put toys and a sustainable option for visiting families that want to play in the sand. Smith hopes that in time, beachgoers looking to build a sand castle will think of the toy bin before buying a cheap bundle of toys that are likely to be forgotten.

“It could be a fun thing for families to take advantage of. When they’re coming to the Front Beach area to know that there’s probably going to be some toys in the bin that their kids could use,” Smith said.

The 12 Best South Carolina Islands to Visit

PureWow editors select every item that appears on this page, and the company may earn compensation through affiliate links within the story. You can learn more about that process here.You’ve already been charmed by Charleston, maybe even made the trip to some ...

PureWow editors select every item that appears on this page, and the company may earn compensation through affiliate links within the story. You can learn more about that process here.

You’ve already been charmed by Charleston, maybe even made the trip to some of South Carolina’s best small towns like Bluffton, Georgetown? and Mount Pleasant. But there’s a lot more awesomeness waiting to be discovered in the Palmetto State…or, shall we say, just off the coast. South Carolina has some really incredible islands that are perfect for vacation, whether you’re intrigued by pirate lore, love exploring salt marshes, fancy a birdwatching holiday or just need a stress-free escape where wild horses run free.

1. HILTON HEAD ISLAND, SOUTH CAROLINA

One of South Carolina’s most popular tourist destinations for a plethora of reasons, Hilton Head Island offers an incredible mix of natural wonder, upscale delights and outdoor activities. You can book whale watching and dolphin spotting boat charters, hit the links, go cycling, hiking and kayaking, play tennis and polo, do some shopping, snap pics in front of the red-and-white-striped Harbour Town Lighthouse and, of course, catch some rays on the beach.

2. DAUFUSKIE ISLAND, SOUTH CAROLINA

No doubt you’ve heard of Hilton Head Island and Savannah in the neighboring state of Georgia. Sitting just off the coast between these well-known vacation destinations is a tiny hidden gem called Daufuskie Island with a population of just 500 residents. There aren’t hotels or big-name attractions. Instead, it's a place of peace, quiet and magical natural wonders—bottlenose dolphins bob in the waters and loggerhead turtles nest on the shore.

3. KIAWAH ISLAND, SOUTH CAROLINA

In terms of true vacation destinations, Kiawah Island is a hole-in-one. It has a huge gated luxury beach and golf resort with loads of swish accommodation and amenities like world-class fairways. You don’t need to be a guest to explore the island, which is open to the public. Daytrippers from Charleston often drive over to enjoy the sandy beaches, hiking and biking trails, tours at Heron Park Nature Center and Marsh Island Park.

4. CAPERS ISLAND, SOUTH CAROLINA

A pretty, undeveloped barrier island oasis, Capers Island is the perfect spot for a family vacation. Beaches, maritime uplands and salt marshes provide the perfect backdrop for outdoor adventure. It’s excellent for birdwatching and wildlife peeping. Be sure to bring your camera to the eye-catching “boneyard beach” where old tree stumps dot the sandy expanse. Bonus: accessibility from Charleston means no long travel days with the kiddos.

5. DEVEAUX BANK, SOUTH CAROLINA

By now you’ve likely gathered that birding is a big deal in South Carolina. Deveaux Bank, a horseshoe-shaped spit of sand at the mouth of the North Edisto River estuary, takes it to the next level as the island actually encompasses a 215-acre sanctuary that’s a protected nesting habitat for many sea and shorebirds. If you’re keen to see eastern brown pelicans and black skimmers, hightail it over to Deveaux Bank.

6. SEABROOK ISLAND, SOUTH CAROLINA

Seabrook Island is a downright dreamy place to live or visit. A lot of people choose to reside in this private, oceanfront community. That’s because it’s pretty as a picture with natural beauty galore, nationally recognized birdwatching, two award-winning golf courses, near-empty beaches, a racquet club, an equestrian center and stunning houses we’d happily call home. And the fact that it’s just a few miles from downtown Charleston yet retains a sense of seclusion definitely helps, too.

7. BEAR ISLAND, SOUTH CAROLINA

A nature lover’s dream, Bear Island feels rugged and remote despite sitting just an hour outside Charleston. This undeveloped and pristinely beautiful 12,021-acre Sea Island is part of the ACE Basin estuarine reserve area and managed by the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. That translates to ample opportunities for bird watching (it’s among the top-ranked spots for twitchers in the entire state) and wildlife viewing, fishing, hiking and biking.

8. EDISTO ISLAND, SOUTH CAROLINA

Where to Stay: “No Saints” Beach House (sleeps 4), Two-Bedroom Unit at Wyndham Ocean Ridge Resort (sleeps 6), Vacation Home Near Beach (sleeps 14)

For a fantastic family-friendly holiday, consider Edisto Island. A laid-back Lowcountry Sea Island not far from Charleston (some people even call it home and commute into the Holy City, just to give you a sense of proximity) that’s approximately 68 square miles and has loads of low-key appeal in the form of sandy beaches and outdoor activities for all ages, including hiking and camping in Edisto Beach State Park.

9. FRIPP ISLAND, SOUTH CAROLINA

Fripp Island doesn’t scream "Shiver me timbers" in that really obvious sort of way. But its treasure hunting past is really interesting and the legends live on. Though, these days, the most seaward of the barrier islands feels a lot less pirate and more residential vacation resort with sandy beaches, tennis courts and golf courses. It’s also a designated wildlife sanctuary. Visitors and residents frequently see great blue herons, wood storks and dolphins.

10. PORT ROYAL ISLAND, SOUTH CAROLINA

Where to Stay: Anchorage 1770 Inn, Best Western Sea Island Inn, The Beaufort Inn

If you’ve spent some time in South Carolina or are generally familiar with the Palmetto State, Beaufort probably rings a bell. Port Royal Island is the island where the aforementioned seaside city resides. There are beautiful beaches, scenic walking trails, boat tours and tons of opportunities for birdwatching. It's also a popular pick for foodies, specifically seafood lovers who come from far and wide to sample fresh-caught Lowcountry fare.

11. CALLAWASSIE ISLAND, SOUTH CAROLINA

Callawassie Island may be one of the hundreds of barrier and sea islands, but this 880-acre private slice of paradise just 17 miles from Beaufort sets itself apart from the rest with its coastline, tidal creeks, lagoons, salt marshes and moss-draped trees. There’s also a butterfly garden and a golf course. Callawassie Island is accessible via the half-mile-long causeway that connects it to the mainland as well as by boat.

12. JOHNS ISLAND, SOUTH CAROLINA

Where to stay: Renovated Cottage (sleeps 6), Bed and Breakfast Porch Rockin’ (sleeps 13), North Beach Pet-Friendly Cottage (sleeps 10)

Sure, bigger isn’t always better. But, then again, sometimes size ups the appeals of a place. Sprawling 738 acres, Johns Island, the largest island in South Carolina and famously a filming location for The Notebook is enchantingly beautiful with miles of wooded trails, farms and lakes. Back to the whole size thing…its most famous feature, the massive ancient Angel Oak stands a whopping 65-feet tall and shades an area of 17,000 square feet.

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