Tree Servicein Sullivan's Island, SC

Let's Talk!

What Clients Say About Us

Eco-Responsible Tree Removal in Sullivan's Island, SC

We have removed thousands of trees over the years. However, we never recommend tree removal if it's not warranted. Some South Carolina tree service companies tend to remove trees when they should be saved or simply pruned. Others go the opposite direction and never recommend tree removal.

Unlike other companies, our arborists make educated recommendations based on experience, your trees, and your needs. We make the right call for you - not for us. If disease, destruction of foundation, or other circumstances necessitate tree removal, rest assured we're recommending it for a reason.

Your Premier Tree Service Company in South Carolina

With years of experience, it's no wonder why so many South Carolina natives choose Palmetto Tree Service over the competition. Clients love us because we exceed expectations with a smile - no if's, and's, or but's.

Our commitment to superior service isn't a gimmick; it's a year-round promise. When you choose Palmetto Tree, you'll benefit from:

  • Professional advice and expertise
  • Seasoned, friendly, hardworking tree care experts
  • Efficient, effective tree care services
  • Competitive pricing

Ready to get started? We're ready to help! Give us a call to learn more about our tree care services and to schedule your first appointment today.

Physical-therapy-phone-number843-345-0579

Free Consultation

Latest News in Sullivan's Island, SC

Men's lacrosse announces 2023 signing class

RICHMOND, Va. – Richmond men's lacrosse announced the members of its 2023 signing class Wednesday, one week after prospective student-athletes enrolling in college in 2023 were first eligible to sign a National Letter of Intent.Twelve players signed a National Letter of Intent to attend Richmond and compete for the Spiders as freshmen in 2023-24. The group is comprised of five players from New York – including three players from Long Island – two players from Ontario, and one each from Georgia, Mass...

RICHMOND, Va. – Richmond men's lacrosse announced the members of its 2023 signing class Wednesday, one week after prospective student-athletes enrolling in college in 2023 were first eligible to sign a National Letter of Intent.

Twelve players signed a National Letter of Intent to attend Richmond and compete for the Spiders as freshmen in 2023-24. The group is comprised of five players from New York – including three players from Long Island – two players from Ontario, and one each from Georgia, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Virginia.

"The 12 young men that just signed their NLIs are an accomplished group," said Spiders head coach Dan Chemotti. "They are stellar students, from lacrosse hotbeds and non-traditional areas, including Canada, and they have excelled in a variety of sports. Above all else, they are phenomenal people with great character who have what it takes to continue the championship culture we've established over the last 10 years. The level of talent in this class is a credit to the hard work by our assistant coaches and the fact that the University of Richmond is, without question, the full package."

Richmond is one of the nation's most successful men's lacrosse programs, having reached the NCAA Tournament in four of the last eight seasons. The Spiders, 2022 Southern Conference champions, have played in eight straight conference championship games, the longest active streak in Division I. In May, the program announced it would move to the Atlantic 10 in 2023 to compete in the inaugural season of A-10 men's lacrosse. UR will be joined by High Point, Hobart, Massachusetts, Saint Joseph's, and St. Bonaventure in the league.

Names, positions, high schools, and hometowns for Richmond's 2023 signing class are below.

NAME (POSITION) - HIGH SCHOOL (HOMETOWN) Gavin Creo (Attack) - Chaminade (Rockville Centre, NY) Michael Fagen (Midfield) - Lynbrook (Lynbrook, NY) Lucas Littlejohn (Attack/Midfield) - Holy Trinity (Courtice, Ontario) Luke Meyer (Attack/Midfield) - Port Washington (Port Washington, NY) Nate Murphy (Defense) - Paul VI (Chantilly, VA) Charlie Packard (Midfield) - Hingham (Hingham, MA) Brayden Penafeather-Stevenson (Defense) - Baldwinsville (Baldwinsville, NY) Sean Siegel (Defense) - Byram Hills (Pleasantville, NY) Lucas Slate (Attack/Midfield) - Episcopal (Downingtown, PA) Tye Steenhuis (Midfield) - Hill Academy (St. Catharines, Ontario) Jackson Strickland (Face Off) - Calvert Hall (Sullivan's Island, SC) Aidan Wooley (Midfield) - Westminster (Atlanta, GA)

Message From The Mayor: November 2022

Happy Thanksgiving. We have much to be thankful for in this great country we get to live in and for the piece of paradise we get to call home. I hope you can spend some time with family and friends and take a moment to reflect on all the things we have to be thankful for.Here are nine fun facts about Thanksgiving to share around the dinner table.• The first Thanksgiving was celebrated in 1621 over a three day harvest festival. It included 50 Pilgrims, 90 Wampanoag Indians, and lasted three days.• Turkey wasn&rs...

Happy Thanksgiving. We have much to be thankful for in this great country we get to live in and for the piece of paradise we get to call home. I hope you can spend some time with family and friends and take a moment to reflect on all the things we have to be thankful for.

Here are nine fun facts about Thanksgiving to share around the dinner table.

• The first Thanksgiving was celebrated in 1621 over a three day harvest festival. It included 50 Pilgrims, 90 Wampanoag Indians, and lasted three days.

• Turkey wasn’t on the menu at the first Thanksgiving. Venison, duck, goose, oysters, lobster, eel, and fish were likely served, alongside pumpkins and cranberries.

• Abraham Lincoln proclaimed Thanksgiving a national holiday on Oct. 3, 1863. Sarah Josepha Hale, the woman who wrote “Mary Had A Little Lamb,” convinced Lincoln to make Thanksgiving a national holiday after writing letters for 17 years.

• The history of U.S. presidents pardoning turkeys is patchy. Harry Truman is often credited with being the first president to pardon a turkey, but that’s not quite true. He was the first to receive a ceremonial turkey from the National Turkey Federation – and he had it for dinner. John F. Kennedy was the first to let a Thanksgiving turkey go, followed by Richard Nixon who sent his turkey to a petting zoo. George H.W. Bush is the president who formalized the turkey pardoning tradition in 1989.

• There are four towns in the United States named “Turkey.” They can be found in Arizona, Texas, Louisiana and North Carolina.

• The average number of calories consumed on Thanksgiving is 4,500.

• Butterball answers more than 100,000 turkey cooking questions via their Butterball Turkey Hotline each November and December.

• The tradition of football on Thanksgiving began in 1876 with a game between Yale and Princeton. The first NFL games were played on Thanksgiving in 1920.

• More than 54 million Americans are expected to travel during the Thanksgiving holiday this year

WHAT’S THE LATEST?

As I mentioned in an earlier message, we recently held a beach traffic debrief session with several of our partners – SCDOT, Mount Pleasant, Sullivan’s Island, Folly Beach, County Parks and Channel 4. The goal of this meeting was to recap all the pre-season joint efforts and discuss what worked well and what didn’t and what could be improved upon for next season.

Mayors, city administrators, police chiefs and senior directors were in attendance. There were a number of takeaways for next year – like starting the social media campaign earlier for the spring break crowds. One of the more effective efforts this past season was the Channel 4 Beach Information Station: Know Before you Go campaign. The goal was to raise awareness about all things related to beach travel and safety.

ABC News 4, Trooper Bob along with mayors and Explore Charleston partnered to produce a series of news stories and messages promoting beach information needed to plan a visit. For Folly Beach, IOP and Sullivan’s Island, it detailed weather, radar, tides, parking information, parking, beach and pet rules, dynamic traffic maps, traffic cameras, CARTA beach shuttle information and Charleston County Park information for IOP and Folly Beach. Between promotional messages, news messages, and social media posts there were over 11.5 million impressions by local viewers and visitors. A very successful joint effort in trying to reach those visiting our beaches. We’ve had some lively meetings and public hearings lately with great attendance by our residents. One thing I’m thankful for is the engagement and passion focused on making our island better.

As we all continue to engage and discuss important topics, let’s lead the way in maintaining civility in our dialogues.

The Municipal Association of South Carolina recently created the Pillars of Civility which include:

• Be as eager to listen as to speak.

• Concentrate on what you have in common, not what separates you.

• Your time is valuable. So is everyone else’s. Respect it.

• Act as you would expect someone to act in your home.

• Ask questions to learn. Answer questions with respect.

• Concentrate on facts, not theories.

• Ask “what will persuade people in this room?” not “what will make a great tweet?”

• Make your case on merits, not on what people want to hear.

• Make your point about the issue, not the person.

I might add one to this list: Work to build each other up, not tear each other down. We are all facing whatever life throws our way. Bringing some empathy to the table as a default setting is a great way to approach each other. You can find information for project updates and upcoming meetings on the IOP website at IOP.net.

UPCOMING EVENTS

Nov. 25 – No Coffee with the Mayor this month due to the holiday. Next one is set for Dec. 30 at the Rec Center at 9 a.m.

Dec. 3 – Holiday Street Festival – 2-7 p.m. at FrontBeach. Arts and crafts, food vendors, children’s activities, and live entertainment.

Dec. 8 – Coffee with the Chief – 9-10 a.m. Join Fire Chief Oliverius at Station 1, Public Safety Building Training Room at 30 J C Long Blvd.

Dec. 20 – Santa’s Cookie Workshop – 2 p.m. at the Rec Center.

Thank you for the opportunity to serve. See you around the island.

Phillip Pounds, Mayor

843-252-5359

ppounds@iop.net

South Carolina Department Of Transportation Stops, Restarts Work On Isle Of Palms Connector Restriping Options

By Brian Sherman for The Island Eye NewsThe South Carolina Department of Transportation stopped working on a study that will provide options to restripe the Isle of Palms Connector in late October, apparently in response to a lawsuit filed by an organization founded by a former IOP mayor and a current Council member.According to IOP City Administrator Desiree Fragoso, she was informed by the SCDOT the evening of Oct. 31 “that they may be pausing the study.” Four days later, on Nov. 4, Fragoso got the word that SCDOT...

By Brian Sherman for The Island Eye News

The South Carolina Department of Transportation stopped working on a study that will provide options to restripe the Isle of Palms Connector in late October, apparently in response to a lawsuit filed by an organization founded by a former IOP mayor and a current Council member.

According to IOP City Administrator Desiree Fragoso, she was informed by the SCDOT the evening of Oct. 31 “that they may be pausing the study.” Four days later, on Nov. 4, Fragoso got the word that SCDOT was moving forward with plans to present its findings to the IOP Council, either on Nov. 15 or Dec. 6, Fragoso said.

“We paused our work in order to let the attorneys review the situation,” Secretary of Transportation Christy Hall said in a Nov. 7 email. “Following their review, we resumed work a few days later. The pause had no significant impact. We are still on track to meet with IOP city officials prior to the end of the calendar year.” Mayor Phillip Pounds said the city did not negotiate with the state agency during the week the study was paused but instead “leveraged our relationships SCDOT and State Sen. (Chip) Campsen to get this thing back on track.” Pounds said SCDOT probably would present eight to 10 options for the Connector bridge at the city Council’s Dec. 6 meeting. The next step is “still to be determined.” Pounds noted that the Council, the Public Safety Committee – headed by Jan Anderson – and the general public might all play a role in paring the options down to a workable number. Without any input from the city of Isle of Palms, SCDOT re-striped the bridge in March 2021, adding two bike lanes and two pedestrian lanes and shrinking the center emergency lane from 10 feet to 4 feet. A year later, former Mayor Jimmy Carroll and sitting Council Member Blair Hahn formed The Palm Republic, a privately funded organization that has questioned the constitutionality of S.40, a law passed in 2021 which grants SCDOT the authority to determine where visitors to IOP, Sullivan’s Island, Edisto and Folly Beach can park on state roads and how much, if anything, these municipalities can charge them. The Palm Republic recently filed a petition and complaint with the South Carolina Supreme Court in an effort to force SCDOT to treat these four communities as it treats the state’s other municipalities. The lawsuit also claims that SCDOT violated the Constitution by restriping the bridge without input from the city. Hahn was not happy with what appeared to be SCDOT’s reaction to The Palm Republic’s lawsuit. “Every citizen has a right to challenge the constitutionality of any statute,” Hahn said. “If a government entity threatens to withhold government services because a citizen is challenging the constitutionality of a statute, that government entity should be held accountable because that’s illegal.” “SCDOT didn’t do a single engineering study or engineering report when they re-striped the bridge. They did nothing except follow the direction of those on high,” Hahn added. Fragoso, meanwhile, said the city would work with SCDOT to find ways to make the configuration of the Connector bridge more palatable to the Council and the community.

“We continue to work collaboratively with DOT in solving issues in our community that need addressing, and we’re eager to see the final report on the IOP Connector, evaluate the options presented and discuss the best path for that project,” Fragoso said.

10 Of Charleston's Beaches You Can't Afford To Miss

South Carolina is known for its spectacular landscapes, with Charleston being one of its major attractions. Charleston offers many things to experience, but its beaches are definitely at the top of the list. While each of these beaches comes with unique features, spectacular views, an incredibly quiet atmosphere, and gorgeous shores are common characteristics. Whether looking for secluded spots for a relaxing vacation, Charleston is the best place to be. Here are the city's 10 beaches travelers can't afford to miss. Burkes Beach...

South Carolina is known for its spectacular landscapes, with Charleston being one of its major attractions. Charleston offers many things to experience, but its beaches are definitely at the top of the list. While each of these beaches comes with unique features, spectacular views, an incredibly quiet atmosphere, and gorgeous shores are common characteristics. Whether looking for secluded spots for a relaxing vacation, Charleston is the best place to be. Here are the city's 10 beaches travelers can't afford to miss.

Burkes Beach

Tourists can experience the best of South Carolina’s sunsets and sunrises from Burkes Beach, which is easily accessible by bike. Travelers can always rent bikes nearby if that's the way they'd like to get around. There is so much to experience at the beach, from beach volleyball to playing tennis and basketball on the courts. There are beach amenities like umbrellas, chairs, and a fenced dog park, where vacationers can take their dogs. If someone is coming in a car, there is a parking space at the end of Burkes Beach Road.

Folly Beach

Folly back is one of the best island beaches in Charleston and is a popular surfing spot, if not the locals' favorite. The beach is packed with several colorful shops, restaurants, hotels, and beach rentals – and it is a perfect time to spend a relaxing moment. The beach is reachable via a short drive from downtown Charleston, making it a gateway to some of the city's most iconic attractions. Travelers should know that summers can have this beach crowded, so arriving early, perhaps by 10:00 am, is the trick.

Edisto Beach

Boasting four and a half miles of gorgeous coastline, Edisto beach is one spot not to miss, especially if into a relatively calm and quiet place. It is also among the most family-friendly beaches, offering numerous activities for both adults and kids. Nestled in Edisto Island, about an hour's drive from downtown Charleston, Edisto Beach is an excellent spot for night camping, picnicking, and looking for seashells, perhaps with family or friends. It is located in a state park, giving access to numerous hiking and biking trails to explore.

Isle Of Palms

Isle of Palms boasts seven miles of beautiful shoreline, and being a close community; families can have the best beach vacation experience here. It is a great place to watch sea turtles and enjoy the beautiful white sands. Plus, there are many activities to explore, from golfing to fishing to boating and water sports. If not with kids, visit Windjammer’s beach bar once the sun goes down after spending a whole day outdoors. The bar’s atmosphere is great, and it serves well-mixed drinks and a pool.

Kiawah Island

It takes a forty-minute drive to get to Kiawah Island from the Historic Charleston if travelers take the State Road 2-10-20. With so many things to see and do on this beach, including swimming, sunbathing, going on nature walks, and biking, it is definitely one of the best to visit in Charleston. The island boasts an incredible shopping village, golfing and tennis opportunities, boating, and fishing. The island's beaches are beautiful, and they feature white sand.

Sullivan’s Island

Located north of the Charleston harbor, Sullivan's Island boasts a population of about 2,000 people and offers. From the island, vacationers will enjoy magnificent views and a fantastic dining scene – and it is a spot loved by the locals. It is important to note that there are no hotels on the island, so vacationers can only make their visit a day trip. Travelers should arrive there early because parking can be a problem. The beach doesn't have public lots for parking, and vacationers can only use one side of the street.

Seabrook Island

Located amidst Edisto and Kiawah Islands, Seabrook Island boasts beautiful beaches that vacationers can't regret exploring. The island's main beaches are located in a private beachfront community and provide a perfect relaxing spot on beautiful sands. Families should opt for Pelican Beach, as it boasts calm waters and is far away from the hustle and bustle of other beaches in Charleston. Travelers looking for breathtaking sunset views should head to North Beach,

Capers Island

Boasting a perfect stretch of sand, beautifully lined with palm trees, Capers Island is incredibly dramatic and is among the best places to explore on South Carolina's coast. Visitors can only get there on boat rides, but Sullivan's Island has some charters vacationers can use. Canoeing and kayaking are other means to get there, but only for travelers into adventures. The beach is located about 20 miles away from downtown Charleston. Capers Island is a great place to go shell hunting, see the tree skeletons, and explore marine life, including some dolphins.

Pawleys Island

Nestled in Georgetown, Pawleys Island is spectacular, and it takes a 25-minute drive to get there from downtown Charleston. It is one of the oldest beaches in South Carolina and is brimming with stunning historical sites, chic cottages, and some gorgeous natural spots. Its beaches are breathtaking and are perfect for lounging and having a peaceful getaway. The island's seafront is gorgeous, and its sand dunes are spectacular. Plus, there are some of the most impressive lakes to explore on the island, so fishing is another activity to enjoy.

Cherry Grove Beach

Located on the northern side of the world-famous Myrtle Beach, Cherry Grove Beach is one of the best beaches to visit in Charleston. One of the most impressive attractions on the beach is the fishing pier, an incredible spot to catch some big fish and watch other sea creatures. The beach offers several activities, including golfing, shopping, and fantastic seafood options in the top-notch restaurants spread throughout the beach.

From Myrtle Beach to Hilton Head, expect coastal erosion possible from Nicole

Another storm means more worry.Coastal South Carolina is bracing for another round of erosion, just over a month after surge from Hurricane Ian damaged dunes and washed away sand from several beaches along the Atlantic Ocean.Large breaking waves up to 6 feet from Tropical Storm Nicole — which made landfall in Florida as a hurricane and is expected to weaken to a tropical depression before its core passes over South Carolina — are expected for parts of the coast until early Nov. 12. The rush could lead to significant...

Another storm means more worry.

Coastal South Carolina is bracing for another round of erosion, just over a month after surge from Hurricane Ian damaged dunes and washed away sand from several beaches along the Atlantic Ocean.

Large breaking waves up to 6 feet from Tropical Storm Nicole — which made landfall in Florida as a hurricane and is expected to weaken to a tropical depression before its core passes over South Carolina — are expected for parts of the coast until early Nov. 12. The rush could lead to significant erosion on beaches that aren’t equipped to handle much more.

Ann Wilson has worked as a park ranger for Myrtle Beach State Park since 1994. She said Ian’s dune destruction was the worst she has seen, even worse than Hurricane Matthew, which hit as a reduced Category 1 in 2016.

“If we had an Ian right now, everybody’s in trouble,” Wilson said.

She likened the protective role of sand dunes in storms to the role of offensive linemen protecting the quarterback in a football game.

“Sand dunes are our first line of defense against storms, wind and waves,” Wilson said. “The sand dunes did their job during Ian. It was a really rough game, and a lot of our players went out on injured reserve. If we had a Super Bowl tomorrow, we’re barely going to show up.”

After Hurricane Hugo decimated the dunes in 1989, regrowth efforts took place along the coastline. But Ian destroyed 20 to 30 feet of sand dunes off the park’s shoreline, which equate to decades’ worth of regrowth.

Because Nicole is not expected to hit the coast as directly or as forcefully as Ian, Wilson said she does not anticipate many issues related to flooding beyond areas where flooding typically occurs during storms, like in Garden City or Cherry Grove in North Myrtle Beach.

“The dunes will rebuild, but it’s not up to us on a timeframe,” Wilson said.

The U.S. Geological Survey said 55 percent of South Carolina’s dunes are forecast to face some level or erosion and about one percent could become inundated.

Pawleys Island, bordered to the west by Pawleys Creek and to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, saw several feet of storm surge brought on by Ian that washed sand and debris into the roads and collapsed the Georgetown County town’s pier.

Nicole’s march toward the Upstate on its way to the mid-Atlantic region and beyond brought street-level flooding during high tide the morning of Nov. 10, with similar flooding seen on the Charleston peninsula.

Subsequent high tides on Pawleys Island should be less severe, said Town Administrator Daniel Newquist.

“I think it’s what we anticipated,” Newquist said. “We anticipated, during the high tide period, water coming over the creek bank and into the roadways.”

Newquist said he planned to inspect the town’s beaches during the afternoon low tide. In an email to island property owners, he said the town is “certainly” concerned about the potential for beach erosion so soon after Ian.

Of beach damage from Ian, Newquist said “fairly significant” erosion occurred and that beach renourishment undertaken in previous years was vital in protecting seaside properties. The Army Corps of Engineers began surveying the sands of Pawleys Island days after Ian’s landfall.

“We’re going to leverage whatever resources are available to us to get the beach back in good shape, but we did get a decent start, I think, with the dune repair work that’s been done with our contractor,” Newquist said.

Folly Beach also lost a good bit of sand during Ian. And the city had already hit its renourishment triggers prior to the storm, said Eric Lutz, the city’s director of building, facilities and public works.

But Lutz said the Charleston County beach should be OK during Nicole.

“There will just be less of it to sit on at each high tide,” he said in an email.

Flooding from Ian was mostly under elevated houses on the east end of the island and the marsh side.

The city also expected flooding on the back of the island from Nicole. To prep, staff was checking storm drains and putting barricades and cones in place for possible road closures.

Nicole Elko, president of Elko Coastal Consulting, said Folly Beach has little to no capacity to withstand additional erosion from another storm. She is working as a coastal consultant for the city.

“Fortunately, the dune system is robust along most of the island, and that will help protect the upland infrastructure,” Elko said.

The city is in the process of requesting federal emergency rehabilitation assistance, partly because of the lack of storm protection and flood mitigation in place to buffer from another hurricane, Elko said.

Other beaches in the Lowcountry also noted damage to dunes and loss of sand during Ian, but they weren’t particularly worried this time around.

“We’re not really doing anything to prevent that situation other than warning residents to be careful if they go in the ocean,” said Andy Benke, Sullivan’s Island town administrator.

Officials in Kiawah Island and Edisto Beach said they did not see measurable impacts from Ian.

Although coastal erosion wasn’t a big issue on Hilton Head Island either, the town started preparing for Nicole this week by removing beach mats, wooden trash bins and umbrella boxes up to the dune lines in beach areas.

Town officials reported high tide coupled with storm surge on Nov. 10 brought “considerable flooding” along some roads and island beaches. Along with flooding, officials warned residents about beach erosion, rough surf and dangerous rip currents.

Nicole Ziege contributed from Myrtle Beach and Mike Woodel from Georgetown County.

Hurricane Wire is a pop-up newsletter during hurricane season that delivers anyone who lives on the East Coast all the information they need to know as storms brew in the Atlantic and beyond.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.