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We have removed thousands of trees over the years. However, we never recommend tree removal if it's not warranted. Some South Carolina tree service companies tend to remove trees when they should be saved or simply pruned. Others go the opposite direction and never recommend tree removal.

Unlike other companies, our arborists make educated recommendations based on experience, your trees, and your needs. We make the right call for you - not for us. If disease, destruction of foundation, or other circumstances necessitate tree removal, rest assured we're recommending it for a reason.

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With years of experience, it's no wonder why so many South Carolina natives choose Palmetto Tree Service over the competition. Clients love us because we exceed expectations with a smile - no if's, and's, or but's.

Our commitment to superior service isn't a gimmick; it's a year-round promise. When you choose Palmetto Tree, you'll benefit from:

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Latest News in Mount Pleasant, SC

Crab Bank Bird Sanctuary sees hundreds of birds return since restoration project

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCIV) — Since the Crab Bank restoration project was completed at the end of 2021, conservation partners have watched hundreds of sea and shorebirds make their retu...

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCIV) — Since the Crab Bank restoration project was completed at the end of 2021, conservation partners have watched hundreds of sea and shorebirds make their return.

Crab Bank Bird Sanctuary is in the middle of the Charleston Harbor.

After Hurricane Irma took out the last of the highest grounds in 2017, conservation partners came together to redevelop and expand the nesting area nearby.

"It's been a really great experience being able to see the community come together to provide a new bird sanctuary for our sea and shorebirds," said Coastal Expeditions education director Katie Morrison.

It is still the middle of nesting season, but since the completion of the restoration project, they have seen hundreds of birds return to Crab Bank.

Oystercatchers were the first to come back with the first single nest found on April 1.

According to Janet Thibault with the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, over 300 nests and pairs of other species have been spotted, as well, including nearly 100 pairs of gull-billed terns, just over 200 pairs of least terns and more than 200 black skimmer nests.

"With sea level rise, and storm surge and development, when the old Crab Bank went away, it really was hard for our other seabirds to find a place to go that they could be safe and to nest, so having this new Crab Bank here is going to be really, really important for our seabirds and shorebirds," Morrison said.

While it might be tempting, it is important to not land on the island. Make sure to observe from a distance.

"These birds really do need their space. They get disturbed really easily, so making sure that we don't land on Crab Bank between March 15 to October 15 will allow for those birds to rest and to protect their young without any disturbances."

What is a safe distance?

"We always say never make a bird fly if you can," said Morrison. "If you're on your boat or if you're kayaking and you are wanting to observe the birds, just make sure that you're a respectful space away from Crab Bank. Use your binoculars to see them closer up; don't get off on the island during that time of the year."

Watching this restoration project brought Katie Morrison joy to watch the birds return.

"Being able to come back out and see the birds out there having a safe place to nest and to rest has been an amazing experience so far."

Proposal for ‘retail village’ in North Mt. Pleasant causing controversy

MT. PLEASANT, S.C. (WCBD) – A proposed retail village in North Mt. Pleasant is raising concerns for some residents nearby.Plans for the nearly 15-acre property located across Highway 17 from Oakland Market and Lowes include a racquet club with tennis and pickleball courts, retail, restaurants, office space, and a luxury pet boarding facility.Developers say it will add to the livability in town....

MT. PLEASANT, S.C. (WCBD) – A proposed retail village in North Mt. Pleasant is raising concerns for some residents nearby.

Plans for the nearly 15-acre property located across Highway 17 from Oakland Market and Lowes include a racquet club with tennis and pickleball courts, retail, restaurants, office space, and a luxury pet boarding facility.

Developers say it will add to the livability in town.

A proposal and results of an impact assessment were presented to the town’s planning committee on Tuesday.

“The primary anchor of this is going to be a racquet facility,” said Mt. Pleasant Councilman Jake Rambo. “A racquetball, tennis facility which I think will be a great addition to the Town of Mt. Pleasant.”

But Mayor Will Haynie says the current proposal is different from the original plan that was presented to Mt. Pleasant Town Council a few years ago.

“These other things, all though there was a small retail component of that, the dog kennel and all that is new. And what we saw today is the tennis center, which is why we originally brought it into the town, is not in phase 1 that’s in phase 2,” said Mayor Haynie. “How do we know that we’ll ever even have the tennis because now the dog kennel and the retail are phase one and that’s a very different thing than I voted for when we brought into the town years ago.”

The pet boarding facility is raising concerns from the church next door, The Church at LifePark.

“We’re very concerned with the nuisance noise of dogs,” said Robbie Wiksell, a church member.

He describes the church campus as a quiet refuge away from a busy town and believes the pet facility will negatively impact that.

“We’re concerned we’re being set up to be continuously annoyed and in conflict with the dog development. We will then be in conflict with the town continuously asking for relief,” said Wiksell.

He hopes that town leaders will reconsider the location of the pet facility to be as far from the church as possible.

The developer switched the outdoor kennel portion of the boarding facility to the other side of the building further from the church, but both Mayor Haynie and Councilmember Rambo say the livability impact needs to be looked at further before the plans are set in stone.

“We have to look hard at what’s the buffer? What’s the placement of something like a kennel that could generate a lot of noise for a church next door,” questioned the mayor.

The planning committee approved the impact assessment and moved to push the proposal forward to be heard in front of the full town council next Tuesday, July 12.

Group pushes for penalties for animal tethering in Charleston County

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCSC) - Charleston County residents can legally tether their animals outside whenever they want for as long as they want, but one group wants to change that.The Charleston Animal Legislative Action League is a bipartisan organization calling for a law to create consequences for potential cases of animal cruelty. Stephanie Fauvelle founded the group after she says she realized there are no laws in the county that adequately protect the animals in the community.“Right now, it is 100% legal to tether a ...

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCSC) - Charleston County residents can legally tether their animals outside whenever they want for as long as they want, but one group wants to change that.

The Charleston Animal Legislative Action League is a bipartisan organization calling for a law to create consequences for potential cases of animal cruelty. Stephanie Fauvelle founded the group after she says she realized there are no laws in the county that adequately protect the animals in the community.

“Right now, it is 100% legal to tether a dog year-round in the snow, during a hurricane, with heavy chains, with a padlock around its neck 24/7, and we want to change that,” Fauvelle said.

The group recently spoke with lawmakers to gain their support and plans to meet with the Charleston Animal Society and Animal Control in the coming weeks.

Fauvelle says Charleston County is behind in comparison to other counties with animal welfare laws. She says some counties and cities even have animal tethering banned.

When asked what the Charleston Animal Legislative Action League plans to do first, she says she wants guidelines to be made clearer.

“The first thing we want to do is put in place humane tethering guidelines,” Fauvelle said. “We understand that not everybody can bring their pets or their dogs inside. We just want to make sure that we provide very clear guidelines for our dogs in our community that are kept outside year-round and also make sure that our law enforcement officers have very clear guidelines as to what they can and cannot enforce.”

Fauvelle says she hopes the penalties for those who violate any guidelines the county establishes toward tethering dogs will be $500 or more on the first offense and $1,000 or more on the second offense if you tether your dog.

Fauvelle says these are the main guidelines she wants Charleston County to put in place regarding animal welfare:

Kelsey Gilmore-Futeral, a legislative attorney with Best Friends Animal Society, says she supports what Fauvelle’s organization is trying to do.

“When we have grassroots support, community members have a way to give their time and their advocacy to create sustainable change for animals,” Gilmore-Futeral said.

She emphasizes that animal welfare is a community problem.

“So, there are about 600,000 people in Charleston County and statistically 80% of homes have a pet,” Gilmore-Futeral said. “So, even if you think that these changes don’t affect you, odds are that they do. If you’ve got a dog or a cat, you want to have your ear in the ground for animal welfare.”

Fauvelle says she hopes the penalties will be $500 or more on the first offense and $1,000 or more on the second offense if you tether your dog. She says the group plans to present their ideas to Charleston City Council within the next two to three months to put this law into legislation.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Personal finance course to become requirement for SC high school students

COLUMBIA, S.C. (WCSC) - To graduate from high school, students probably had to learn the Pythagorean Theorem, memorize the three branches of government and their functions, and read a little Shakespeare.But in the future, South Carolina students will also need to learn skills like managing credit cards and filing taxes to get their diplomas.This upcoming requirement to take a personal finance course comes after a multi-year, bipartisan push at the State House to make sure South Carolina students are financially literate and pre...

COLUMBIA, S.C. (WCSC) - To graduate from high school, students probably had to learn the Pythagorean Theorem, memorize the three branches of government and their functions, and read a little Shakespeare.

But in the future, South Carolina students will also need to learn skills like managing credit cards and filing taxes to get their diplomas.

This upcoming requirement to take a personal finance course comes after a multi-year, bipartisan push at the State House to make sure South Carolina students are financially literate and prepared for life after high school.

“I think it’s so important to try to teach some of these fundamental skills to these kids as soon as they can so they just get off on the right foot,” Bill Joy said.

Joy teaches a personal finance class at Lucy Beckham High School in Mount Pleasant, where students have to take the course during their sophomore year.

His lessons cover units on budgeting, checking, savings, and more.

“We actually teach kids how to prepare taxes, and actually some of those kids have gone on to prepare taxes for their parents. So these are the type of sort of life skills that I think are really valuable,” Joy said.

Soon, all South Carolina high schoolers will have to learn these skills to graduate.

A law written into the current state budget directs the South Carolina Department of Education to develop the regulations for a required high school course in personal finance by the end of September, to be approved by the State Board of Education.

“We all understand our students need this. They need the foundation and the background knowledge and the schema and the financial literacy, rather than finding it out when it’s too late,” David Mathis, the deputy superintendent for SCDE’s Division of College and Career Readiness, said.

Those regulations include how the half-credit requirement will fit in with the 24 credits needed to graduate and which graduating class will be the first that will have to pass the course to earn their diplomas.

Mathis said they want to be able to offer different options for students to complete this requirement, which could include taking the course virtually, as an elective, or as part of their career and technology education requirement.

The new personal finance requirement will not be in place for the upcoming school year, as Mathis said it could take around a year just to develop the course standards.

“Once that is done, we have to build the coursework around that. We have to secure materials and resources that districts can choose from,” Mathis said.

The Department of Education will also have to work in time for professional development and to train teachers on the new course.

But at least one teacher, Joy, said it is worth it.

“Everybody living in the state, I really think it’s going to better prepare our kids to deal responsibly with money,” Joy said.

Personal finance is a required course to graduate high school in more than a dozen states, including most in the southeast.

Among neighboring states, North Carolina already has a personal finance requirement in place, while Georgia just passed a law this year adding it.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

The 7 best places to visit in South Carolina: from sandy shores to outdoorsy adventures

South Carolina is a Southern charm-infused orchestra of landscapes that plays to perfection year-round.Creating this harmony are world-class white sand beaches and mega golf destinations along its Atlantic edge, Blue Ridge mountain vistas inland, large cities that never overwhelm and Lowcountry towns that leave you in the ...

South Carolina is a Southern charm-infused orchestra of landscapes that plays to perfection year-round.

Creating this harmony are world-class white sand beaches and mega golf destinations along its Atlantic edge, Blue Ridge mountain vistas inland, large cities that never overwhelm and Lowcountry towns that leave you in the highest of spirits.

Immerse yourself in the best experiences the world has to offer with our email newsletter delivered weekly into your inbox.

South Carolina is primed for a multi-city road trip with several mega interstates and major US roadways zigzagging throughout the state. At a minimum, you’ll want to plan a long weekend or a week in the Palmetto State to truly dabble in its geographic wonders and warm and undeniably twangy natives.

From the 26,000-acre national park to the museum-clad capital, and a coastal gem of a city that will leave any foodie loosening their belt a notch, these are the best places to visit in South Carolina.

Congaree National Park is the best place for outdoor adventures

Tucked in the middle of South Carolina and approximately 20 miles southeast of Columbia, Congaree National Park is where people come to quietly unwind. This nearly 27,000-acre park is a biodiverse spectacle, with towering hardwoods, stringy Spanish moss, a two-plus mile elevated boardwalk and the calm Congaree and Wateree Rivers comprising its landscape.

Central and staffed, Congaree National Park appeases off-the-grid multi-day campers and those seeking a guided experience. Each Saturday year-round, rangers and local volunteers lead guided tours of some of the park’s most astonishing experiences, including turtles the size of a coffee table, hand-sized spiders and “Champion Trees” that rank among the largest trees on earth.

Myrtle Beach is the place to go for a family day out

As soon as you set foot on Myrtle Beach’s soft sands, you’ll get why it’s considered the vibrant heart of South Carolina’s “Grand Strand” (a 60-mile stretch of beaches along the Atlantic). Within its coastal confines, there’s truly something for every family member, spanning boardwalk strolls (and perhaps a SkyWheel ride?), craft brewery excursions with bocce ball action at Crooked Hammock Brewery and, of course, endless days on the beach.

For a family-friendly outing, Surfside Beach is the perfect destination, so much so that it's locally known as Family Beach. A small independent community with nearly 2 miles of ocean frontage, it has mini golf (Adventure Falls Golf), the Wild Water & Wheels Water Park and the Surfside Bowling Entertainment Center, ideal for rainy days.

Charleston is a top destination for foodies

“Holy City” is a godsend for those seeking quintessentially Southern or an internationally infused dining experience. Its King Street artery and urban core tantalizes all the senses, from its mix of Georgian, colonial, and federal-style buildings to its boutique shops selling the local essentials like Southern-inspired hats, bowties and suits to its seemingly endless array of restaurant options.

You and yours will want to go to Charleston hungry and if there’s a must-stop restaurant on your itinerary, make a reservation in advance. One not to miss is the central Hotel Bennett and its Gabrielle patio overlooking Marion Square.

For arguably the best biscuit in town, there’s a Callie’s Hot Little Biscuit just blocks north (order anything but get it with pimento cheese). For a refined sit-down experience off the main drag, head to Bistronomy by Nico in the town’s Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial District. Be sure to try the mussels (served in a kaffir lime broth) or the curry crab soup that will have you begging for the recipe.

Where you stay is half the Charleston fun. Central options span the Roaring Twenties-inspired boutique The Spectator Hotel, the French Quarter Inn with a daily wine and cheese reception and the aptly named waterfront HarbourView Inn.

For a quiet retreat with seamless access to the city, book the Embassy Suites by Charleston Harbor Mt. Pleasant. It has panoramic views of Charleston’s steeple-filled skyline and the nearby former Navy aircraft carrier, the USS Yorktown. If you want to work off all those meals, you can walk across the iconic Arthur Ravenel, Jr. Bridge to get to and from downtown.

Columbia is the best place for exploring museums and gardens

Stately buildings and open spaces await in South Carolina’s capital city. Where the Saluda and Broad Rivers meet (and, fun fact, where the Congaree River starts), many of the city’s biggest draws are on the shores of the rivers, including the Riverbanks Zoo & Garden and, for disc golf lovers, Granby Park.

On the museum front, major draws include the South Carolina State Museum, Columbia Museum of Art and the nearly 100,000 sq ft EdVenture Children’s Museum.

Columbia is as bustling as a South Carolina town gets with a hybrid of governmental buildings and youthful buzz stemming from the University of South Carolina. Book a South Carolina State House tour to make the best of all worlds.

If you’re visiting South Carolina in the fall or winter months, catch a University of South Carolina football game. Prepare for maximum pandemonium if they happen to be playing in-state rival Clemson.

Greenville serves the best coffee in South Carolina

This upstate city provides a rush in so many ways. Tucked in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains, you’ll find Falls Park on the Reedy in its center, where the 345-ft Liberty Bridge guides folks above a multifaceted waterfall.

The surrounding parks are home to small gardens, theater festivals and locals stretching out for picnics or taking their dog for a walk. The vibe makes it among the best romantic and unique places to visit in South Carolina.

From Falls Park, you can keep the rush going just north along Main Street. Amid mom-and-pop restaurants and regional chains, the Peace Center Concert Hall and a smattering of hotel options, prioritize a trip to Methodical Coffee for the best cup of Joe in all of the Palmetto State.

Born and bred in Greenville, Methodical Coffee has quickly become a US specialty coffee heavyweight and has three cafes in town. Snag a pour-over coffee or cold brew – don’t put any sugar or milk in it, because it will be flavorful enough without it.

Florence is a great city with a small-town flair

“Magic City” is home to approximately 40,000 South Carolinians and is the soul of the state’s Pee Dee region. (You’ll see various references to Pee Dee plastered along interstates – it refers to the local river as well as the Pee Dee native tribe).

Downtown Florence’s brick-dotted urban core – nearly 1.1 sq miles – has experienced a revitalization in recent years with modern museums, galleries and public spaces taking center stage.

Primed for a day trip, hit the Florence County Museum with rotating exhibits featuring regional artists. Across the street is the Francis Marion University Performing Arts Center, which has an amphitheater, two theaters and regular orchestra productions.

Florence's SC Pecan Festival held in November is a national draw, attracting 50,000-plus folks wanting to try pecan-infused everything.

Greenwood is the perfect place for a quiet retreat

Greenwood lives up to its name, with lush trees aplenty throughout its downtown/Main Street thoroughfare and surrounding areas. Arts and parks are vital to making a day in this quiet town of 25,000, which is approximately 90 minutes west of Columbia.

The town's arts hub is the Arts Center of Greenwood, housed in the stately Federal Building. Here you can peruse pieces by local artists (sometimes including creations by school kids, adorably). The Center also hosts art classes.

Lake Greenwood State Park is a major draw for largemouth bass fishers (you need a state license to fish) and campers – there are more than 100 campsites along the lake’s shore.

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