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We have removed thousands of trees over the years. However, we never recommend tree removal if it's not warranted. Some South Carolina tree service companies tend to remove trees when they should be saved or simply pruned. Others go the opposite direction and never recommend tree removal.

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With years of experience, it's no wonder why so many South Carolina natives choose Palmetto Tree Service over the competition. Clients love us because we exceed expectations with a smile - no if's, and's, or but's.

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In a Shifting Economy, a Developer Keeps Asking What Buyers Want

This article is part of our latest special report on International Golf Homes.When it comes to second homes and golf communities, South Street Partners has more than a dozen years of experience under its belt, riding the industry through economic ups and downs and the increased popularity of drive-to developments in...

This article is part of our latest special report on International Golf Homes.

When it comes to second homes and golf communities, South Street Partners has more than a dozen years of experience under its belt, riding the industry through economic ups and downs and the increased popularity of drive-to developments in the wake of Covid-19.

South Street, a private equity development firm based in Charlotte, N.C., and Charleston, S.C., has scored major acquisitions of the Kiawah Island Club in South Carolina and its two golf courses; Palmetto Bluff in Bluffton, S.C.; and the Cliffs development, which is set in the Blue Ridge Mountains and has seven separate communities in South Carolina and North Carolina.

With $1 billion in assets, the company’s strategy has been to primarily focus on the southeastern United States, which has experienced sustained population growth partly because of the migration of families and older adults to warmer climates.

Prices start around $2 million in their suite of developments, and Chris Randolph, a partner, says South Street is seeing no slowdown. In the coming year, South Street is building new homes at Kiawah and the Cliffs developments in South Carolina, particularly around Lake Keowee, and in Palmetto Bluff.

Golf remains, depending on where you live, a popular — and lucrative — attraction, so South Street is planning two new courses at Palmetto Bluff in the coming years: a nine-hole short course by King-Collins (architects of the Sweetens Cove course outside Chattanooga, Tenn., which has attracted investors like Peyton Manning); and another course at a private club.

At Kiawah, where Covid increased golf demand and drove up home prices, Beau Welling, Tiger Woods’ design partner, will work on a new course with a residential component. South Street plans to put a considerable amount of land into a conservation easement.

Mr. Randolph spoke about his firm’s investment plans and residential golf developments. The following conversation has been condensed and edited.

South Street just raised its first discretionary fund of $225 million. What does the fund allow you to do for the future, and how will it affect your existing portfolio of properties?

This is the first discretionary fund in South Street’s history and allows us to be more acquisitive of new properties while continuing to work with our legacy investment partners in the private equity and hedge fund space. At the same time, it will also allow us to do deals entirely on our own, to the extent we would like to do that.

As for existing properties, we will use the fund to make improvements at Palmetto Bluff, where we’re building a short course and a regulation 18-hole course, and Kiawah, where we will build a new 18-hole course, as well as other amenities and development activities.

How will you handle the golf real estate at both Kiawah and Palmetto Bluff? Has anything changed about how South Street views residential golf communities?

We may have a bit of a novel approach in that we’re not necessarily layering in real estate directly on the golf course. We want to create the best golf experience possible. From our perspective, that means what I would call a core golf course with little to no real estate impacting the golf experience.

Our theory is that if you create an incredible world-class golf experience, just the proximity of homes to that course will yield higher prices than a traditional fairway-lined real estate golf course development.

When you talk about giving the architects the best land, how much of that is member/customer-driven, and how much of that might be attributed to the average golfer’s growing understanding of what a good golf experience entails?

I think it’s both. We think the golf consumer has gotten far more sophisticated in terms of what they expect. To deliver on that, we need to find the best land for the best golf.

I used the term novel earlier, and I think it is probably still considered a little bit of a novel approach in our industry to not try and really integrate a ton of real estate on the golf frontage.

Another factor that’s driving this for us is that, at Kiawah, we actually see premiums for lots and homes on the parks that we’ve developed versus golf courses. The theory there is that people, especially young families, will pay more for frontage on a park they can access 24 hours a day versus a golf course where you really are only getting out there before and after the golfers play.

South Street has really made a push into offering turnkey homes at its properties. This seems to follow an industry trend. Is that consumer-driven, or simply the best way to maximize profit?

It’s very much consumer-driven and probably the biggest change to our industry, meaning high-end second-home communities. Fifteen years ago, the product of choice was the estate lots where you buy a lot, find an architect, find a builder, find a landscape architect and manage that all yourself.

Through the downturn of 2008 to 2010, people started taking a different approach, where they weren’t necessarily interested in taking on a project of that type. They still wanted a second home, but they were willing to trade some of the customization for a turnkey product that checked probably 90 percent of their boxes.

If you look at our home building activity, we are now the largest home builder at Kiawah and the largest home builder at the Cliffs. We will soon be the largest at Palmetto Bluff, because we believe fully in that strategy of delivering a finished product and doing so with scale and efficiency.

On Lake Keowee [at the Cliffs], we just set a record with a purchase price of $6.3 million. We designed it, built it and did the interiors, all the way down to the forks and knives in the drawers.

To that point, what are other major developments you’ve noticed in the last 10 years, and where do you foresee things going in the next five years?

As we enter into whatever this recessionary — whether it’s deep, shallow, long or short — environment, we’re going to be very conscious of what that means for our buyers.

The good news is we’ve got a very long-term outlook at all of our projects of 10-plus years, if not more. So, we don’t concern ourselves too much with slowdowns in the market in terms of our business plan, but we also want to be conscious of overdeveloping during a time when sales might not be there.

So, we’ll continue to build our amenities. We’ll continue to build the clustered neighborhoods around those amenities. Maybe we’ll scale back a little bit on some of the larger spec homes, but I don’t think it changes our business plan much at all, if any.

One thing we know is that you can’t rinse and repeat. That might have worked in another time, in different cycles. We’ve got to create unique products and, more than anything, we have to deliver the best product possible from both a club and resort experience.

At the end of the day, that’s what people are buying: the private club experience we can offer. The home is important, but you’re buying a lifestyle. Our buyers have worked a long time to have the ability to buy into these communities. The service, amenities and experience we offer need to be just world class.

CHAMPIONSHIPS Desert Mountain to Host Pair of USGA Amateur Four-Ball Events September 14, 2022 | Liberty Corner, N.J. By Joey Geske, USGA

A pair of USGA Amateur Four-Ball championships are headed to Desert Mountain in 2026 and 2029. (Desert Mountain Club)Desert Mountain Club, in Scottsdale, Ariz., has been chosen by the USGA to host the 2026 U.S. Amateur Four-Ball and 2029 U.S. Women’s Amateur Four-Ball Championships. These will be the second and third USGA championships held at Desert Mountain.“We’re thrilled to bring both of our four-ball championships to Desert Mountain and the state of Arizona for the first time,” said Mark Hill, USGA ...

A pair of USGA Amateur Four-Ball championships are headed to Desert Mountain in 2026 and 2029. (Desert Mountain Club)

Desert Mountain Club, in Scottsdale, Ariz., has been chosen by the USGA to host the 2026 U.S. Amateur Four-Ball and 2029 U.S. Women’s Amateur Four-Ball Championships. These will be the second and third USGA championships held at Desert Mountain.

“We’re thrilled to bring both of our four-ball championships to Desert Mountain and the state of Arizona for the first time,” said Mark Hill, USGA managing director, Championships. “The variety of risk-reward options throughout the club’s signature golf courses will allow for exciting and dramatic team competition, while providing a comprehensive test that will produce worthy champions.”

Located in North Scottsdale and established in 1986, Desert Mountain features six Jack Nicklaus-designed championship courses, plus a par-54, 18-hole seventh course. The private club and community extends across 8,300 acres of Sonoran Desert terrain set at an altitude of about 3,000 feet. Its unique collection of courses offers landscapes that range from dramatic elevation changes to rolling fairways reminiscent of Scottish links.

“All of us at Desert Mountain Club are honored to host the 11th U.S. Amateur Four-Ball and the 14th U.S. Women’s Amateur Four-Ball,” said Chris Storbeck, championship chair. “Our membership believes strongly in supporting competitive amateur golf, and we look forward to partnering with the USGA to showcase our community and deliver two first-class championships.”

The Cochise Course at Desert Mountain played host to the 1999 U.S. Senior Women’s Amateur Championship won by Carol Semple Thompson. It was the first of four consecutive titles for the Sewickley, Pa., resident.

The PGA Tour Champions’ season-ending Charles Schwab Cup Championship was held at the venue four times between 2012 and 2016, and is a former site of the Regions Tradition, one of five senior major championships, which it hosted from 1989 to 2001. Nicklaus won four of his eight senior major titles on the Cochise Course during that stretch. The club has also hosted several collegiate and amateur events, including the Desert Mountain Intercollegiate and the Southwestern Amateur, which has been played on four different Desert Mountain courses since 2013.

The 11th U.S. Amateur Four-Ball, with a starting field of 128 sides (264 players), will be played May 16-20, 2026. The 14th U.S. Women’s Amateur Four-Ball, with a starting field of 64 sides (128 players), will be held May 12-16, 2029. The USGA will name competition courses for both championships at a later date.

These will be the 19th and 20th USGA championships held in Arizona, respectively. The Grand Canyon State most recently hosted the 2019 U.S. Women’s Mid-Amateur at Forest Highlands Golf Club in Flagstaff, won by Ina Kim-Schaad, and is slated to host the 2023 U.S. Senior Women’s Amateur and the 2025 U.S. Mid-Amateur at Troon Country Club in Scottsdale.

The U.S. Amateur Four-Ball and U.S. Women’s Amateur Four-Ball debuted in 2015 and are open to two-player sides (or teams) of amateur golfers of all ages with individual Handicap Indexes not exceeding 5.4 for men and 14.4 for women. Partners comprising teams or sides are not required to be from the same club, state or country.

The 2023 U.S. Amateur Four-Ball, which will be played at Kiawah Island Club (S.C.) on its Cassique and River courses, recently set a championship record with 2,551 entries accepted by the Aug. 10 deadline. Qualifying for the event began on Aug. 25 and concludes on Dec. 12. The 2023 U.S. Women’s Amateur Four-Ball will be held at The Home Course in DuPont, Wash., with qualifying having begun on Aug. 22 and continuing through Dec. 7.

Now Jill Biden tests POSITIVE for COVID: First Lady, 71, forced to isolate on South Carolina family vacation after two weeks apart from husband - and starts taking Paxlovid

Jill Biden tested positive for COVID-19 and is experiencing 'mild symptoms', the East Wing announced on Tuesday morning.'She's doing well,' President Joe Biden told reporters when he landed back in Washington D.C.The first lady's positive diagnosis comes as the Bidens wrapped up their family vacation in Kiawah Island, South Carolina – and just 10 days after President Biden, 79, finally ended isolation from his bout of coronavirus.Biden wore a face mask when he boarded and disembarked Air Force One for the journey f...

Jill Biden tested positive for COVID-19 and is experiencing 'mild symptoms', the East Wing announced on Tuesday morning.

'She's doing well,' President Joe Biden told reporters when he landed back in Washington D.C.

The first lady's positive diagnosis comes as the Bidens wrapped up their family vacation in Kiawah Island, South Carolina – and just 10 days after President Biden, 79, finally ended isolation from his bout of coronavirus.

Biden wore a face mask when he boarded and disembarked Air Force One for the journey from South Carolina back to the nation's capitol. He will do so for the next 10 days, the White House said, as he's considered a 'close contact' to the first lady.

Hunter Biden and his wife Melissa, who had been on the vacaction and traveled back with the president, also wore face masks.

Jill Biden, 71, remains in South Carolina to stay in isolation, according to her office.

She will stay at a 'private residence in South Carolina and will return home after she receives two consecutive negative COVID tests,' her office said.

She has started a round of Paxlovid treatment. The first lady is fully vaccinated and doubled-boosted.

President Biden remains in the clear of the virus so far, receiving a negative antigen test result on Tuesday morning.

But he will have his testing frequency increased as he is considered a close contact to his wife.

'Consistent with Centers for CDC guidance because he is a close contact of the First Lady, he will mask for 10 days when indoors and in close proximity to others,' the White House said.

'We will also increase the President's testing cadence and report those results.'

First Lady Jill Biden tested positive for COVID-19 on Tuesday morning after a negative test Tuesday and while wrapping up a family beach vacation. Pictured: The first lady shops at Freshfields Village shops in Kiawah Island, South Carolina on Sunday, August 14, 2022

Biden tested negative for COVID-19 on Tuesday morning and will keep his normal schedule, according to the White House

Jill Biden's spokesperson Elizabeth Alexander said the first lady tested negative for coronavirus on Monday morning, before she started experiencing 'cold-like symptoms' later Monday evening.

Her antigen test, which she took after beginning to experience symptoms, came back negative. But a subsequent PCR test yielded a positive result.

'Close contacts of the First Lady have been notified,' Alexander noted.

This is Jill Biden's first time having COVID, the East Wing said. She kept her distance from her husband when he had the virus last month, staying in Delaware while he was isolating at the White House.

She was scheduled to travel to Florida on Thursday for a Warriors Games event but canceled those plans.

The first lady did not join the president, Hunter Biden and his wife Melissa Cohen when they went to the Beach Club on Kiawah Island on Monday night.

The day prior, however, Jill was pictured on a bike ride with President Biden and their granddaughter Finnegan, daughter of Hunter Biden.

Later on Sunday afternoon she was spotted shopping with Finnegan and Cohen at the Freshfields Village shops on Kiawah Island.

President Biden, who is also fully vaccinated and double boosted, first tested positive for COVID-19 on Thursday, July 21.

White House Physician Kevin O'Conner released daily letters on the president's condition, noting that throughout his infection he experiences symptoms like a runny nose, cough, sore throat and body aches.

After isolating for the minimum five days, Biden tested negative on July 26 and 27.

He gave a speech in the Rose Garden on July 27 with a hopeful message for boosted Americans: They can now 'live without fear' of the virus.

The president, however, came down with a rare rebound case on July 30, forcing him back into isolation until August 7, when he returned to Delaware to be reunited with his wife.

President Biden will keep his normal Tuesday schedule, the White House said. He will spend just hours in Washington to sign the inflation Reduction Act before leaving for his home in Wilmington, Delaware, later Tuesday evening.

The 9 best golf courses you can play in SC, according to Golf Digest. Take a look

Summer is winding down, but there’s still plenty of time for a few rounds of golf in South Carolina.But where should you go for your next golf trip?South Carolina is loaded with golf courses. Myrtle Beach alone has more than 90 courses, most of which are public. But fear not, because Golf Digest can help you decide.The popular monthly magazine has compiled a list of the nine best go...

Summer is winding down, but there’s still plenty of time for a few rounds of golf in South Carolina.

But where should you go for your next golf trip?

South Carolina is loaded with golf courses. Myrtle Beach alone has more than 90 courses, most of which are public. But fear not, because Golf Digest can help you decide.

The popular monthly magazine has compiled a list of the nine best golf courses you can play in South Carolina, from Charleston to Hilton Head and everything in between.

Located on the eastern-most end the Kiawah Island, the Ocean Course has the most seaside hills in the Northern Hemisphere. The course was designed to give players an unobstructed view of the coastline from every hole.

The course can also be particularly challenging, due to strong winds from the Atlantic.

This perennial favorite among PGA Tour players is located on Hilton Head Island. The course has undergone recent enhancements, such as new Celebration Bermuda grass for the fairways and a new irrigation system. Since 1969, it has been home to the RBC Heritage Presented by Boeing.

This 18-hole Jack Nicklaus Signature Course in Bluffton is surrounded by century-old live oaks and scenic native landscapes. The 7,171-yard course includes several holes on the bank of the river.

Built in the 1940s, the Dunes Golf and Beach Club dubs itself as the premier country club in Myrtle Beach. The 18-hole, oceanside course has been host to numerous high-end golf tournaments, from the PGA Senior Tour to the USGA Women’s Open.

This Pawleys Island golf course opened in 1994 and has been a perennial part of many top 100 golf course lists ever since. The 18-hole course was the first solo design of the late Mike Strantz.

Hall of Fame players and course architects Greg Norman, Davis Love III, Tom Fazio and Pete Dye designed the multi-course Barefoot Resort in North Myrtle Beach. They’ve all received awards, but the Dye course stands above them all. The unique bunkering at the Dye course helps it stand out.

True Blue is known for its vast fairways and impressive elevation changes. It’s also the sister course to the Caledonia in Pawleys Island. The club features an 18-acre practice facility and is just minutes south of central Myrtle Beach.

The Tournament Players Club of Myrtle Beach has challenged many golf legends over the years, including Lanny Wadkins, Gary Player, Lee Trevino and Ray Floyd. The 18-hole course is open to the public and offers PGA Tour-caliber challenge. It also has a practice area, numerous water hazards and strategically-placed trees.

The championship-level Osprey Point Golf Course was completely renovated in 2014. The course offers four challenging par-3s, four distinctive par-5s and 10 par-4s ranging in length from 340 to 461 yards. The track’s classic-style clubhouse adds to its appeal.

This story was originally published August 18, 2022 5:00 AM.

How to Spend 48 Hours on Kiawah Island, SC

From renowned tennis and golf facilities to miles of breathtaking beaches, there's so much to see and do on Kiawah Island, South Carolina. Here's your guide to experiencing it all.Kiawah Island is an upscale destination in South Carolina’s Lowcountry known for its beautiful scenery and residences, and its wide variety of family-friendly activities. Here, we’re sharing our experience with a destination within the destination — the Kiawah Isla...

From renowned tennis and golf facilities to miles of breathtaking beaches, there's so much to see and do on Kiawah Island, South Carolina. Here's your guide to experiencing it all.

Kiawah Island is an upscale destination in South Carolina’s Lowcountry known for its beautiful scenery and residences, and its wide variety of family-friendly activities. Here, we’re sharing our experience with a destination within the destination — the Kiawah Island Golf Resort. Don’t let the name fool you. Yes, it’s famous for its golf courses, but there’s so much more to it than that! For some, the draw might be miles of expansive beachfront to explore or quiet marshlands to discover by kayak. Some might prefer to dedicate the weekend to indulging in local food and drink, while others may stick to the area’s renowned tennis or golf facilities, where it’s exciting to play on the same turf as the pros. Here’s a weekend itinerary that allows you to take advantage of it all.

The resort is 33 miles from the Charleston airport and less than that from the historic area of town, so Kiawah’s location makes for a great way to experience relaxing beach time in conjunction with all the charms of Charleston. Kiawah accommodations include the luxurious Sanctuary Hotel, with its 255 rooms on the ocean, and a variety of villas spread out over the property under picturesque live oak trees. You can also rent one of the larger private homes and still enjoy resort privileges by going through Kiawah’s website. Check-in time is mid-afternoon, but that doesn’t mean you can’t get there earlier and start exploring.

SB Note: As with many resorts, making reservations well ahead of time for meals and activities is highly recommended.

All 255 rooms at Kiawah’s luxury hotel, The Sanctuary, come with balconies and upscale amenities: Italian linen sheets, a deep soaking tub, and plush robes in the closet. Image: Kiawah Island Golf Resort

The Sanctuary opened in 2004, and the idea was for it to feel like a grand, historic seaside mansion. With that in mind, the furnishings are elegant but not over the top. The expansive lobby offers plenty of places to sit, and almost all rooms possess a view of the Atlantic Ocean. Image: Kiawah Island Golf Resort

Head to one of the bicycle rentals (one at The Sanctuary and another at West Beach Pool Shop), where you can secure a bike — there are plenty of options, including an adult tricycle or bicycle for two — then grab a map and start exploring! Kiawah excels at its easy-to-follow bike paths, and you’ll find 30 miles of trails that wind through wooded areas, over bridges, through neighborhoods, and along golf courses. You’ll likely spot signs pointing to beach access and, by all means, head that way. Kiawah’s vast shoreline is perfect for long walks, but bike-riding on the beach is a big thing here, too!

As beach-goers ponder the pros and cons of the Gulf Coast versus the East Coast, consider this: the firmly packed sand at Kiawah is ideal for bike-riding by the ocean, with plenty of space to avoid running into people. Bikes are easy to rent at Kiawah, and getting around the resort is a breeze with 30 miles of dedicated bike trails (plus the beach). Image: Kiawah Island Golf Resort

Golf courses and bike trails at Kiawah are surrounded by lush, almost other-worldly landscaping, such as this hole on the Cougar Point Course along the marshlands. Image: Kiawah Island Golf Resort/O’Brien

Lowcountry cuisine is the theme at Jasmine Porch, a restaurant at The Sanctuary. It’s a great choice for breakfast, but it’s also a relaxed, delicious option for dinner. Consistent with the hotel’s decor, brick walls and oak floors bring in a bit of Charleston charm, and there are patio tables if the weather cooperates. The restaurant menu boasts fresh-caught choices, but when in doubt, go with the specialty here: shrimp and grits.

On day two of your expedition, get up close and personal with Kiawah’s natural beauty in a kayak. The scenic Mingo Point offers guided and self-guided kayaks through the marshes, where you can observe abundant birdlife and maybe even a dolphin. Kiawah’s Night Heron Nature Center is a big hit with children, but all ages can learn from its displays and educational materials.

Natural beauty is abundant at Kiawah, and the resort loves to help guests get up close and personal with its naturalist programs. Here, a bird-watching naturalist brings his scope and binoculars to view the dozens of bird species on the island. Image: Lisa Mowry

There are two ways to get around the resort other than a car: the aforementioned bicycles and a continuously running shuttle. One way or another, get yourself over to Tomasso at Turtle Point for lunch with an Italian flair. Hand-tossed pizzas and artisan salads are one way to go, but there’s heartier fare, too, such as meatball subs and short-rib grilled cheese.

Next, relax by the pool or splurge on a spa treatment — both excellent ways to spend an afternoon. The Spa at The Sanctuary is one of the reasons the resort received a five-star Forbes rating, so you’ll want to try it out! The spa’s spacious layout includes multiple relaxation rooms, a whirlpool/sauna/steam room, and thoughtful refreshments. In other words, arrive early for your massage or facial treatment to enjoy the whole luxurious experience.

Receiving a treatment at The Spa at The Sanctuary is a well-earned splurge. Make sure to get there early to enjoy a soak in the whirlpool or relax in one of the lounges. Image: Kiawah Island Golf Resort

The Sanctuary’s U-shaped building offers a large lawn with plenty of places to sit and be mesmerized by the ocean. Image: Kiawah Island Golf Resort

Whether or not you’re a golf enthusiast, head over to the famed Ocean Course, the #4 public golf course in the U.S. Even non-golfers will swoon over the rugged, breezy landscape, which is often compared to locations in Scotland and Ireland. And even without a round on the coveted course, visitors can access the clubhouse, including a pro shop and dining area. Grab a drink at the Ryder Cup Bar, with its gorgeous views of the course and ocean. The Atlantic Room next door has a similar ocean setting with signature seafood selections for dinner. All the appetizers look terrific, but don’t miss the crispy shrimp starter with sweet chili sauce — They apparently removed it from the menu one day and received so many complaints that it was back 24 hours later! The Country Captain seafood stew is also well-known, and you can’t go wrong with a catch of the day prepared with seasonal vegetables.

The Ryder Cup Bar, also at the Ocean Course, is a pub-type spot for lunch or a drink. Image: Lisa Mowry

Restaurants are strategically located around the resort, but be sure to visit one of the spots at the Ocean Course (home to all of the significant PGA championships) to feast your eyes on the gorgeous view. The Atlantic Room at the Ocean Course is open nightly for dinner, and you can’t go wrong with the fresh-caught seafood. Image: Kiawah Island Golf Resort

The Atlantic Room’s Seafood Stew is one of the most popular items on the menu, with its array of ocean delights: fresh-caught shrimp, clams, crabs, and Carolina Gold Rice in a special broth. Image: Kiawah Island Golf Resort

If you can spare another day of activities before heading home, start the morning of day three with Yoga on the Beach. Then choose from any number of adventures such as fishing expeditions, tennis lessons, mosaics, or a photography cruise. Of course, there’s also nothing wrong with sitting on the beach, watching the shorebirds do their thing, and dreaming of your next trip to Kiawah. After all, it’s known for its repeat visitors!

For more information on Kiawah Island Golf Resort, head to kiawahresort.com.

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