Tree Servicein Johns Island, SC

Let's Talk!

What Clients Say About Us

Eco-Responsible Tree Removal in Johns Island, SC

We have removed thousands of trees over the years. However, we never recommend tree removal if it's not warranted. Some South Carolina tree service companies tend to remove trees when they should be saved or simply pruned. Others go the opposite direction and never recommend tree removal.

Unlike other companies, our arborists make educated recommendations based on experience, your trees, and your needs. We make the right call for you - not for us. If disease, destruction of foundation, or other circumstances necessitate tree removal, rest assured we're recommending it for a reason.

Your Premier Tree Service Company in South Carolina

With years of experience, it's no wonder why so many South Carolina natives choose Palmetto Tree Service over the competition. Clients love us because we exceed expectations with a smile - no if's, and's, or but's.

Our commitment to superior service isn't a gimmick; it's a year-round promise. When you choose Palmetto Tree, you'll benefit from:

  • Professional advice and expertise
  • Seasoned, friendly, hardworking tree care experts
  • Efficient, effective tree care services
  • Competitive pricing

Ready to get started? We're ready to help! Give us a call to learn more about our tree care services and to schedule your first appointment today.

Physical-therapy-phone-number843-345-0579

Free Consultation

Latest News in Johns Island, SC

James Island residents express concern over proposed development filling wetlands

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - People who live on James Island are rallying together and encouraging an email campaign against a development off of Folly Road and Grimball Road Extension.The development would build 68 townhomes, 5 workforce units and commercial space. It would also allow for filling in 0.23 acres of freshwater non-tidal forested wetlands.Greg Payton lives on Donnie Road, right off of Grimball Extension. His family has lived in the home and community for more than 100 years. The proposed development would back up t...

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - People who live on James Island are rallying together and encouraging an email campaign against a development off of Folly Road and Grimball Road Extension.

The development would build 68 townhomes, 5 workforce units and commercial space. It would also allow for filling in 0.23 acres of freshwater non-tidal forested wetlands.

Greg Payton lives on Donnie Road, right off of Grimball Extension. His family has lived in the home and community for more than 100 years. The proposed development would back up to his home. He says he is worried about a lot of things, including stormwater runoff and traffic.

“They want to fill in the wetlands, and they’re going to have to cut down some trees, so if it rains, where is the water going to go? It’s going to come on our families, it’s going to be in our backyards and we’re going to be flooded under,” Payton says.

He also has concerns about how the amount of people moving in would affect traffic and the livability of his neighborhood.

“I say each unit is two cars, that’s 140, where are they going?” Payton asks “People have to go to work in the morning, how long will it take for people to come down Grimball Road Extension?”

He says he wants to attend a public hearing about the plans.

“We want to make sure that if they are going to build something, that they do it correctly,” Payton says.

The applicant developers are requesting to fill a little less than a quarter of an acre of wetlands. That filling would not have “a substantial adverse impact,” according to an Army Corps of Engineers initial study. The study found the filling would have ‘no effect’ on any federally endangered or threatened species.

The applicant is asking to fill .2 acres to construct a commercial parking lot and the other .03 to install a stormwater drainage structure, according to a June 24th, 2022, Army Corps of Engineers’ notice.

The report says the applicant will preserve the remaining .75 acres of wetlands to compensate for any impacts.

The Army Corps of Engineers is taking comments on the project through Monday, July 11. Operators of the ‘Save James Island’ Facebook page are encouraging people who are opposed to sending an email reading in part:

“I oppose the filling of any wetlands (no matter how ‘small’)…this historic area is plagued by flooding and drainage issues, and the preservation of natural wetlands and trees are our best and least-costly defense. Pleas hold a public hearing so the Army Corps of Engineers has ALL of the information, including the voice of the people who live here.”

The applicant appeared before Charleston City Technical Review Committee in April and is working to resolve some of the comments before coming back with a revised plan for the development.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

10 Things Charleston, South Carolina is Famous For

Charleston is a picturesque, amazing, and historic city that is filled with unique shopping and dining experiences. It immerses guests in nature, offering them incredible and eye-catching sights and an abundance of outdoor activities at their doorstep. From colorful houses to charming architecture, excellent cuisines, and impressive plantations, this place offers a vibe worth experiencing. Here are things that make Charleston popular. The Charleston MuseumVisitors can check out artifacts and antiques at Charleston Museum. Th...

Charleston is a picturesque, amazing, and historic city that is filled with unique shopping and dining experiences. It immerses guests in nature, offering them incredible and eye-catching sights and an abundance of outdoor activities at their doorstep. From colorful houses to charming architecture, excellent cuisines, and impressive plantations, this place offers a vibe worth experiencing. Here are things that make Charleston popular.

The Charleston Museum

Visitors can check out artifacts and antiques at Charleston Museum. The museum was established in 1773 and was utilized as a slave auction gallery. Here, visitors can see stone items, traditional costumes & shoes, Civil War-era weapons, ornaments, armors, and genuine dinosaur skeletons. History buffs can also learn more about the dark history of the area.

Joe Riley Waterfront Park

Charleston is a city of unbeatable beauty and has a lot to offer visitors. Its beauty attracts foreigners and natives alike. Among the most frequented attractions in the city is the Joe Riley Waterfront Park. Situated a stone’s throw from the Charleston city market, the park offers visitors amazing views of the Cooper River Bridge and Charleston Harbor. At the center of the park, visitors will be impressed by the highly recognized attractions, a splash fountain and the popular pineapple fountain. These awe-inspiring attractions are spectacular to watch when lit up at night.

Cathedral Of Saint John The Baptist

Charleston is home to many big and beautiful churches. While dozens of US city skylines comprise more skyscrapers, this is different from Charleston. Its impressive skyline is dominated by church spires. Charleston’s Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist is one of the most highly sought-after attractions. Visitors will definitely be inspired by its fascinating history. The cathedral was first established in 1854. However, it got destroyed by fire after six years. It took almost five decades for the completion of the present cathedral.

James Island

James Island is one of the most serene, romantic, and wildly scenic destinations in Charleston. Nestled between Downtown Charleston and Folly Beach, this luxurious hideaway is a walkable destination from the city. Its proximity to some views of the relaxing shore is exactly why so many visitors come to the island. After spending time on the island, visitors can proceed to Fort Sumter, as it is tucked away on an island just off the east coast of James Island.

Southern Food & Seafood

Visitors will not have truly experienced Charleston without tasting its authentic local food. The city is a mouth-watering haven for foodies. The best way visitors can proclaim their love for this amazing city is by visiting the numerous locally owned restaurants to savor scrumptious cuisines. Some of these restaurants include 82 Queen and Poogan’s Porch.

Old Exchange And Provost Dungeon

Old Exchange and Provost Dungeon were built way before the independence of the United States. This historic building is usually used as the main landmark in Charleston. It is also used to host significant events in South Carolina. It has also been utilized as a commercial exchange, custom house, post office, city hall, and military headquarters, among functions.

Dock Street Theater

Dock Street Theater boasts of being the first ever building identified for use as a playhouse in the initial thirteen colonies, which proclaimed independence. Although the original structure was set in 1809, it was converted into a theater in 1935. Created with visitors in mind, Dock Street Theater is an ideal place for visitors to spend their free time. The theater is a melting pot for history, and that’s why it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The Historic Charleston City Market

Charleston City Market is among the few places that don’t need a lot of convincing people to consider. The market began as a meat and vegetable market, but as time passed, more and more business joints mushroomed. From popular sweetgrass baskets to local paintings and souvenirs, this place is indeed a shopping powerhouse. The market boasts more than 150 retailers that deal with clothes, books, jewelry, and cosmetics.

South Carolina Aquarium

South Carolina Aquarium is a worthy stop if looking for aquariums in the US. Visitors can learn about real animals that they have never envisioned they’d meet in real life. The aquarium features a myriad of marine life species. Visitors will catch a glimpse of otherworldly invertebrates, sharks, and a wide range of colorful fish. Visitors will also be pleasantly amazed by the numerous interactive exhibitions and a 4D cinema show with vibrating seats.

Plantations Of Charleston

Charleston has numerous plantations, such as Middleton Place, Drayton Hall, Charleston Tea Plantation, Magnolia Plantation & Garden, and Boone Hall Plantation. There is something magical about these Plantations. Visitors who love nature can visit these plantations and have an entirely different experience in each of them. For instance, The Magnolia Plantation & Garden is a true gem with diverse wildlife. It also has a zoo and a nature tram that transports visitors around.

Minero’s 2nd act provides space for new Johns Island restaurant to reach its full potential

For those who frequented Minero during its tenure on East Bay Street, driving from downtown Charleston to Johns Island for charcoal-grilled chicken wings, cheese-crusted burritos and catfish tacos might not feel right.That is until you pull into the spacious gravel parking lot and walk through the large covered patio to the hostess stand where you’ll put your name in the queue. A wait is almost guaranteed — especially as the new restaurant works through an industry-wide staffing shortage — but Johns Islanders and oth...

For those who frequented Minero during its tenure on East Bay Street, driving from downtown Charleston to Johns Island for charcoal-grilled chicken wings, cheese-crusted burritos and catfish tacos might not feel right.

That is until you pull into the spacious gravel parking lot and walk through the large covered patio to the hostess stand where you’ll put your name in the queue. A wait is almost guaranteed — especially as the new restaurant works through an industry-wide staffing shortage — but Johns Islanders and others who made the drive on June 22 didn’t seem to mind.

Some formed a short line at the indoor-outdoor bar for a margarita or pint from nearby breweries Estuary Beans & Barley and Low Tide Brewery. Others gathered outside, where there’s plenty of room to roam.

The new compound is a far cry from the tight downtown quarters Minero occupied from 2014 to 2020, a venue that required patrons to walk up steep stairs to a small, albeit quaint, dining room. Now, it takes just a couple steps for the up to 175 people that Minero can seat indoors and out to order the dishes and drinks that gained a following during its downtown days.

While the original Minero was wildly popular, the new space offers the restaurant room to reach its full potential with a lively ambiance that pairs with new and exciting flavors from executive chef Shamil Velazquez.

‘The guests know this food’

Velazquez isn’t new to the Charleston area. For three years, the Puerto Rican-born chef has been demonstrating his ability to deliver sophisticated, elegant food in a casual setting at Delaney Oyster House on Calhoun Street in downtown Charleston. Before that, he helmed the kitchen at a now-closed Husk outpost in Greenville, where he served the hyper-local Southern cuisine that’s become synonymous with the restaurant first opened by Sean Brock.

So we know Velazquez has range in the kitchen, but recreating Minero’s favorites presented a new challenge for the chef.

“The guests know this food, they know what they’re looking for, they know what it tastes like,” Velazquez said. “So I have to make sure it looks and tastes exactly the same as they had it so that food memory recall can just activate when they take that first bite of that wing or that catfish taco.”

Velazquez credited Minero chef de cuisine Teikel Stafford for helping with the transition. Stafford was a part of the opening team at the original Minero back in 2014, making him the ideal candidate to lead day-to-day operations on Johns Island, giving Velazquez the flexibility he needs to also lead the kitchen at Delaney Oyster House. Charcoal grilled wings tossed in Valentina hot sauce ($16), burritos ($13-$19) and the beef and chorizo double cheeseburger ($17) are among the options that returned to Minero when it opened in June.

Minero’s menu of seemingly rudimentary appetizers and entrees are anything but, starting with the tacos. Corn and flour tortillas are made in-house, a two-day endeavor. Right now, the kitchen is churning out more than 300 of each daily for fried catfish, al pastor, chicken, steak and cauliflower tacos (2 for $11, 3 for $16).

“We’re just striving for the best quality taco we can possibly provide to the guest,” Velazquez said. “It’s definitely been the most challenging thing to do even though it seems like the simplest.”

Labor of love

Tortillas aren’t the only labor of love at Minero. Others hint at Velazquez’ upbringing in Santa Juanita, Bayamón, located on the outskirts of San Juan. Eating empanadas was a near-daily occurrence for Velazquez during his youth in Puerto Rico. But the fried and filled savory turnovers weren’t initially slated for Minero’s menu, despite the success of his Caribbean beef empanadas at Delaney Oyster House.

Velazquez and his team instead set out to serve taquitos — a tightly rolled fried taco of sorts — but the cooking process was drying out the pork filling.

They turned to the empanadas ($15), one of Minero’s top sellers since its opening.

“We wanted to have some sort of fritter on the menu, and empanadas were at the bottom of the list just because they are very labor intensive,” Velazquez said. “We get to roast the pork for 24 hours the Puerto Rican way; Puerto Rican with a couple little Mexican flavors in there.”

The crispy kan kan pork tomahawk ($44) also combines Puerto Rican and Mexican flavors. Drawing on the popular island combination of pork and guava, Velazquez brines a custom-cut of pork before marinating it with sofrito, a paste-like sauce commonly made of onions, peppers, garlic, cilantro and other ingredients, depending on the chef. The colossal chop is then par-baked, fried and tossed in a guava barbecue sauce and served with avocado, sweet plantains, red rice and beans.

“It’s a lengthy process, but I think it’s worth every penny. It’s definitely something you have got to get used to because the skin is not something that everybody’s into,” Velazquez said, discussing the crisp, chewy skin that develops around the edge of the chop. “For me personally, gnawing on the skin and all that, it reminds me a lot of home and my childhood.”

The few flashes of Puerto Rican influence fit at Minero, and that’s by design. Velazquez’ detailed approach to the menu combines a desire to draw on nostalgic tastes while staying true to the Minero concept.

“I’m obviously not Mexican. I didn’t grow up with that culture, but it’s very similar in the sense that Mexico is also all about sharing and using the best resources around you to create something delicious to share with your family,” Velazquez said. “That resonates well with me, and that’s why I’m able to put some of my dishes and crossover between the two.”

Perfecting the process

Nearly half of Minero’s seats are located on the covered patio, separated from the dining room by an open garage door, where the bar is located. An outdoor overflow space is equipped with cornhole boards and benches, allowing patrons to have a place to sip on a drink from the bar while they wait for a table.

Having ample outdoor space was a big priority, said General Manager Kevin King, who joined Minero after previously leading day-to-day operations at Husk.

“We were definitely expecting to be busy so we wanted a place for people to feel comfortable,” King said, discussing the bar. “We have the garage door open, so you have that nice open feel.”

Speaking of the bar — King developed a cocktail menu that draws on the original Minero with a few new twists. The Minero Margarita ($13) is served as it once was, with reposado and añejo tequilas, fresh lime, orange juice, curaçao and agave. Between that, Minero’s do-it-yourself margarita and a “lite” variation served with blanco tequila, lime and sparkling water, King says they are selling quite a few margaritas.

The entire cocktail menu, which also features a frosé sangria ($10) and other boozy beverages, is void of sugar. Instead, King steeps lime husks in agave to create what’s called a lime cordial that adds citrus and sweetness to many of the drinks.

Minero is a big place, and diners might notice empty tables if they visit in the coming weeks. It’s a prime example of why patience and kindness are key in today’s dining landscape. King said decisions on how many tables the restaurant can handle are made daily with the goal of not overextending the staff.

“There’s a huge demand for the space,” King said. “You can do as much training as you want, but when it comes time for game time, we have to be on it.”

So far, getting enough business to dial in their process has not been a problem, as a line of excited diners usually forms just before 4 p.m. Wednesday though Sunday, the days Minero is currently open.

That line could get even longer and more frequent once the business reaches full capacity, allowing for the addition of its highly anticipated lunch and brunch services.

Charleston to spend around $10M to fix drainage issues on Johns Island

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The City of Charleston says it is looking to spend millions of dollars to create a creek and additional wetlands to address street flooding and drainage issues on over 500 acres of Johns Island.Rather than paving the area over for the Barberry Woods Drainage Improvement Project, the city said it is opting for a more ecological approach.“Creating our own semi-natural creek system. It will look like a natural creek, even though we had dug it out,” Charleston Stormwater Management Director Mat...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The City of Charleston says it is looking to spend millions of dollars to create a creek and additional wetlands to address street flooding and drainage issues on over 500 acres of Johns Island.

Rather than paving the area over for the Barberry Woods Drainage Improvement Project, the city said it is opting for a more ecological approach.

“Creating our own semi-natural creek system. It will look like a natural creek, even though we had dug it out,” Charleston Stormwater Management Director Matthew Fountain said. “Then, you would build a flood plain on either side of the creek that can hold water during storm events that would be built-in with natural vegetation.”

Photos captured the flooding following a heavy storm in the Barberry Woods neighborhood near Maybank Highway and River Road, which the project is named after.

City officials said the project will make the flooding drain faster and be less frequent.

Two homeowners who have been living in Barberry Woods since the mid-2000s said they love where they live, but a fix to their drainage problems has been long overdue.

“Once we do get the flooding, the flooding remains, and there’s no way for it to go,” homeowner Shannon Baker said. “It turns into a swimming pool scenario. I tried to get a vehicle out, and I did it a little too early, so I lost that [GMC] Yukon.”

“A week after I bought the house, my mother and my brother were visiting and came out onto my top porch, and they saw somebody kayaking past my house,” homeowner Kim Hicks said.

The city said a combination of developments downstream and blocked drainage ways are to blame for the flooding.

They also said the project was first inspired several years ago by the Dutch Dialogues. The city, along with the Historic Charleston Foundation, created the Dutch Dialogues in 2019 to discuss ways to work with the land that’s already there to reduce flooding risks on the peninsula, in West Ashley and on Johns Island.

“Don’t fix flooding in a way that eliminates what makes Charleston special,” Fountain said. “You need to find a way to do both. This is trying to find a way to maintain that rather than just paving the whole area over in concrete and asphalt.”

The city said they’re finishing the final designs and expect construction to start sometime in 2024.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Commentary: On Johns Island, a sixth road alternative will save our sense of place

Johns Island is much more than a traffic jam: It is a collection of people with deep connections to place and community. Many have been here for generations and have roots in the island’s agricultural history. More are new neighbors who moved to this beautiful Sea Island seeking a purposeful way of life.The island’s roads are in dire need of improvement, which is one reason Charleston County residents voted for the 2016 half-cent sales tax to fund necessary upgrades, such as improvements along the Main Road Corridor. Work ...

Johns Island is much more than a traffic jam: It is a collection of people with deep connections to place and community. Many have been here for generations and have roots in the island’s agricultural history. More are new neighbors who moved to this beautiful Sea Island seeking a purposeful way of life.

The island’s roads are in dire need of improvement, which is one reason Charleston County residents voted for the 2016 half-cent sales tax to fund necessary upgrades, such as improvements along the Main Road Corridor. Work on Segment A, or the flyover at U.S. Highway 17 and Main Road, is moving forward, and now the county is considering Segment C: improvements to Bohicket Road, from Maybank Highway to Betsy Kerrison Parkway.

All five alternative proposed designs create four- and five-lane highways through the southern portion of Johns Island, drastically changing its character.

Hence the formation of Rational Roads, a nonprofit advocacy group whose goal is to develop a more effective, less destructive solution to the five unacceptable options provided in 2020 for the Main Road Segment C project.

Change is hard. New ideas are often deemed “radical” or even “irrational.” But change is necessary. Too many highways in Charleston have cut through and destroyed communities due to a lack of creative visioning. Better, more local solutions for road improvements exist, and to get there, the community must be engaged. Because who understands the safety concerns and chokepoints better than the local community? Transportation planners, engineers and elected officials should rely on community members’ insight from the beginning.

Our grassroots methodology is steeped in community feedback and data. Rational Roads has hosted more than a dozen meetings in the past year via Zoom and at churches, breweries, community gatherings and farmers markets. We’ve engaged developers, conservationists, pastors, students, farmers and more. We have found that Johns Islanders are deeply connected to the soul and preservation of this island. And we know that 21st century problems can’t be solved with 20th century solutions, especially when it comes to road building.

At Rational Roads, we are asking County Council to update the “purpose and need” for the Main Road Segment C project; that’s what will guide the direction of the Segment C project. We feel strongly that the purpose and need should include safety. Johns Island needs a customized approach for our community that goes beyond a five-lane road from point A to point B, stripping our community of its character and missing a critical opportunity to address safety concerns and create a connected sense of place.

We raised funds to work with traffic engineers to develop a sixth alternative, one that addresses our island’s traffic needs by adding left-turn lanes, roundabouts and intersection improvements at key locations where accidents are happening and congestion is occurring. Our local traffic data revealed that the worst safety and congestion issues exist between Mary Ann Point and Edenvale roads.

Through our conversations with residents across the island, we heard loud and clear that the road should be aligned with the island’s rural character, so Alternative 6 includes safe and connected streets with infrastructure for all road users, including people on foot and on a bike.

These types of improvements, combined with upgrades to Johns Island’s community center, would improve our sense of place, reflect our community values and enhance our quality of life.

Choosing inclusivity over divisiveness, we have engaged County Council members, elected leaders at the city of Charleston, state lawmakers and county staff, and we are finding renewed hope that collaboration can lead to bold improvements. Our plan can be adapted to avoid wetlands, home relocations and trees. Working with County Council and staff, we will keep improving Alternative 6 to ensure that it is the least-destructive and most cost-effective approach.

As we update our design based on recent feedback, we ask County Council to include safety and context-based designs in the project’s stated purpose and need. We can either have a road that looks like Highway 17 cutting through our island’s rural heart or a series of street and traffic upgrades that work together to enhance safety and incorporate localized designs based on a cohesive community vision.

We have the tools to build better roads. Rational Roads is showing that working together every step of the way will help us do just that.

Kate Nevin is a co-founder of Rational Roads for Johns Island and a Johns Island resident.

Get a weekly recap of South Carolina opinion and analysis from The Post and Courier in your inbox on Monday evenings.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.