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We have removed thousands of trees over the years. However, we never recommend tree removal if it's not warranted. Some South Carolina tree service companies tend to remove trees when they should be saved or simply pruned. Others go the opposite direction and never recommend tree removal.

Unlike other companies, our arborists make educated recommendations based on experience, your trees, and your needs. We make the right call for you - not for us. If disease, destruction of foundation, or other circumstances necessitate tree removal, rest assured we're recommending it for a reason.

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With years of experience, it's no wonder why so many South Carolina natives choose Palmetto Tree Service over the competition. Clients love us because we exceed expectations with a smile - no if's, and's, or but's.

Our commitment to superior service isn't a gimmick; it's a year-round promise. When you choose Palmetto Tree, you'll benefit from:

  • Professional advice and expertise
  • Seasoned, friendly, hardworking tree care experts
  • Efficient, effective tree care services
  • Competitive pricing

Ready to get started? We're ready to help! Give us a call to learn more about our tree care services and to schedule your first appointment today.

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Latest News in Isle of Palms, SC

Isle of Palms prepares for late season storm

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WCIV) — As Hurricane Nicole makes its way to the Lowcountry, officials along the coast are concerned about possible beach erosion.In September, Hurricane Ian left its mark on the Isle of Palms.“Lot of debris, for sure. Beach erosion was not so bad with Ian, and we’ll keep our fingers crossed for Nicole coming up. But a lot of debris, trees down, flooding in our hotspots," says Philip Pounds, the mayor...

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WCIV) — As Hurricane Nicole makes its way to the Lowcountry, officials along the coast are concerned about possible beach erosion.

In September, Hurricane Ian left its mark on the Isle of Palms.

“Lot of debris, for sure. Beach erosion was not so bad with Ian, and we’ll keep our fingers crossed for Nicole coming up. But a lot of debris, trees down, flooding in our hotspots," says Philip Pounds, the mayor of Isle of Palms.

In preparation for Nicole, IOP's Public Safety team surveyed the beaches.

“Our public safety folks did some drone footage earlier this week just to kind of have a base line for a pre-storm view, and then they’ll do a post probably Saturday when the storm clears out just to see if we have any erosion," continued Mayor Pounds.

The direction of the storm is also causing some concern.

“Didn’t have any issues with Ian. This one, again, since we’re on the other side of the storm, there’s certainly heightened concerns. But hopefully by the time it gets here, we’re talking 30 to 40 mile per hour winds mostly and storm surge of a couple of feet. Hopefully that won’t do too much, but we’ll probably have some issues," said Mayor Pounds.

Nicole is expected to bring heavy winds, rain, and possible isolated tornadoes, which is why Mayor Pounds is assuring the public he's preparing for the worst.

"We’ve pulled off all the trash cans that sit out on the beach for beachgoers. We’ll have some public safety personnel this week," Mayor Pounds says.

His main message is to be cautious.

“As we saw with Ian, the past changes pretty regularly and a few miles makes a big difference. This one seems pretty certain as far as the cone as where it’s going so, but certainly for residents just stay plugged in wherever you get your news from," said Mayor Pounds.

We also checked in with Sullivan's Island town officials. They say they will continue to keep an eye on the beaches, but no emergency evacuation order has been issued.

9 Southern Cities That are Getting Too Expensive for Retirees

As you make retirement plans, you may consider things like your investments, medical and life insurance, and where you want to live.But not every city is a good place to retire. Before settling on a new location, factor in the cost of living, quality of health care, and social factors for older Americans.The key is to ...

As you make retirement plans, you may consider things like your investments, medical and life insurance, and where you want to live.

But not every city is a good place to retire. Before settling on a new location, factor in the cost of living, quality of health care, and social factors for older Americans.

The key is to avoid throwing away your money in retirement by making poor choices. If you have Southern cities on your list of potential areas to move to when you retire, here are a few that you may want to cross off your list for being too expensive.

Do you dream of retiring early?

Retiring early is a goal for many, but few of us have a plan for how to actually do it.

Instead we have questions like... How much money do we need? Where should we keep that money?

A financial advisor can help you sort through your options and come up with a solid plan. Get started today by taking this quiz from SmartAsset to get matched with a vetted financial advisor in your area.

1. Palm Beach, Florida

Florida may be an ideal destination for many retirees, but some places in the Sunshine State are much less affordable than others.

Take, for example, Palm Beach. The typical cost for a home in Palm Beach is more than $2 million, according to real estate website Zillow, and the value of a home there has gone up more than 46% in the past year.

2. Brentwood, Tennessee

Brentwood’s proximity to Nashville may be appealing to retirees, particularly those who enjoy the music and other entertainment that the area can provide. But housing costs could turn down the volume of enthusiasm.

The typical home value for the city is more than $1.2 million, according to Zillow. That equates to an increase of 38% over the past year, which might make the area out of reach for retirees on a fixed income.

3. Naples, Florida

Another warm retirement spot in Florida is Naples on the Gulf Coast side of the state, but it may not be a good place for retirees. The average home price is above $590,000 and has risen a dramatic 52% in the past year.

If you’ve worked hard to , you probably don’t want to spend all of that retirement money too quickly and end up short on funds. Instead, remember to factor in where you’re going to live when you decide it’s time to start your post-work life.

Resiliency, humility and hustle: MUSC celebrates military veterans, who bring key attributes to health care roles

MUSC veterans and supporters attended an online Veterans Day ceremony to honor their service, courage, sacrifices and their many contributions to protecting the nation, on Nov. 11. The event was held virtually to allow all employees and students to be part of the Veterans Day holiday.The ceremony started with the MUSC Public Safety Color Guard presenting the flags of the armed forces, which accompanied the national anthem. MUSC student 2nd Lt. Nadia Robinson shared the history and purpose of Veterans Day.Lt. Col. Joseph Bernard...

MUSC veterans and supporters attended an online Veterans Day ceremony to honor their service, courage, sacrifices and their many contributions to protecting the nation, on Nov. 11. The event was held virtually to allow all employees and students to be part of the Veterans Day holiday.

The ceremony started with the MUSC Public Safety Color Guard presenting the flags of the armed forces, which accompanied the national anthem. MUSC student 2nd Lt. Nadia Robinson shared the history and purpose of Veterans Day.

Lt. Col. Joseph Bernard, a retired United States Marine Corps officer who now serves as COO of MUSC Health-Midlands Division, was the keynote speaker for the virtual event, offered via Microsoft Teams.

Bernard pointed out the similarities between military service and working in the medical field.

“The past two plus years, under the dark cloud of the COVID pandemic, it has shown that resiliency is essential for us to be effective as individuals and as a team and organization,” said Bernard. “But military veterans bring a sense of humility and respect to the table, and they always bring a high energy and a willingness to hustle and get the job done. That bias for action allows us to accomplish the important mission of providing the highest quality of care across the state of South Carolina.”

Cathy Durham, DNP, showed the kind of veteran resilience Bernard referenced. In 2020, Durham worked on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic in New York City, the epicenter of the virus in those early days. Durham, the assistant dean for graduate practice programs and an associate professor in the Doctor of Nursing Practice Program at MUSC’s College of Nursing, is a proud veteran, having joined the United States Navy in 1995. Since 2007, she has served in the Navy Reserve, where she holds the rank of captain. Her service in the Navy Nurse Corps led her to New York City to help during a very demanding time.

Durham said Veterans Day is special for her, since her family has a long history of military service. She chooses to spend the day with her spouse, who is also a veteran, and her family.

As chaplain and manager of Pastoral Care Services for MUSC Health-Charleston Division, Frank Harris draws on his own experience to support patients as well as the standards and values at MUSC. Harris served 10 years active duty in the United States Air Force, stationed in Oklahoma, Florida and Charleston. Additionally, he was deployed twice during both Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom. He said he observes the day reflecting on the experiences, the values he’s gained and the colleagues he served with.

Bernard also brought up teamwork and stated that awareness and care for those around is a shared value of both the military and MUSC. “Once you're in the military, it becomes readily apparent that you're not there for yourself,” Bernard said. “You're there to support those military members that are on your left, that are on your right. It's a team effort, that kind of collaboration and alignment is required to be successful in the US military.”

Rob Chisholm is the licensing and credentialing coordinator in the Graduate Medical Education Office in the College of Medicine. Chisholm spent five years active in the Air Force, where he was stationed in Michigan but also volunteered for special duty assignment at Rhein-Main Air Base in Germany. He said he chooses to be in community on Veterans Day. He said he contacts his brother, USAF retired, and his father, who also spent five years in the Air Force. He also attends a local Veterans Day parade in Charleston and visits the VFW Post on the Isle of Palms.

During his keynote address, Bernard shared his belief that the values of MUSC and those of the military intersect. “At MUSC, we have standards of professional behavior,” he said. “Those are compassion, collaboration, integrity, respect and innovation. If you think about each one of those behaviors and think about your time in the military, I think you can draw a very easy connection between your military service and what you do today at MUSC.”

Bernard also raised the subject of teamwork and stated that awareness and care for those around is a shared value of both the military and MUSC. “Once you're in the military, it becomes readily apparent that you're not there for yourself,” he explained. “You're there to support those military members that are on your left, that are on your right. It's a team effort; that kind of collaboration and alignment is required to be successful in the U.S. military.”

The afternoon concluded with Bernard conducting a Q&A session. Many veterans in attendance asked questions about his experience on Marine One, the helicopter that Bernard piloted during the Clinton administration. He finished his remarks with a quote from President Barack Obama: “When the world makes you cynical, whenever you seek true humility and true selflessness, look to a veteran.”

After decades serving country in Marines and VA, Robert Hincken donated brain to advance treatments for dementia.

Irma Moving West Over Northern Cuba

Here is the 2 pm advisory from the National Hurricane Center:...IRMA LINGERING OVER THE NORTH COAST OF CUBA... ...MAJOR HURRICANE FORCE WINDS EXPECTED OVER THE FLORIDA KEYS AT DAYBREAK...SUMMARY OF 200 PM EDT...1800 UTC...INFORMATION ---------------------------------------------- LOCATION...23.1N 80.2W ABOUT 65 MI...100 KM E OF VARADERO CUBA ABOUT 145 MI...235 KM SE OF KEY WEST FLORIDA MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...125 MPH...205 KM/H PRESENT MOVEMENT...W OR 280 DEGREES AT 9 MPH...15 KM/H MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...941 MB...27.79 IN...

Here is the 2 pm advisory from the National Hurricane Center:

...IRMA LINGERING OVER THE NORTH COAST OF CUBA... ...MAJOR HURRICANE FORCE WINDS EXPECTED OVER THE FLORIDA KEYS AT DAYBREAK...

SUMMARY OF 200 PM EDT...1800 UTC...INFORMATION ---------------------------------------------- LOCATION...23.1N 80.2W ABOUT 65 MI...100 KM E OF VARADERO CUBA ABOUT 145 MI...235 KM SE OF KEY WEST FLORIDA MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...125 MPH...205 KM/H PRESENT MOVEMENT...W OR 280 DEGREES AT 9 MPH...15 KM/H MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...941 MB...27.79 INCHES

WATCHES AND WARNINGS -------------------- CHANGES WITH THIS ADVISORY:

None.

SUMMARY OF WATCHES AND WARNINGS IN EFFECT:

A Storm Surge Warning is in effect for... * Volusia/Brevard County line southward around the Florida peninsula to the Suwanee River * Florida Keys * Tampa Bay

A Storm Surge Watch is in effect for... * North of the Volusia/Brevard County line to the Isle of Palms, South Carolina * North of the Suwanee River to Ochlockonee River

A Hurricane Warning is in effect for... * Fernandina Beach southward around the Florida peninsula to the Aucilla River * Florida Keys * Lake Okeechobee * Florida Bay * Cuban provinces of Camaguey, Ciego de Avila, Sancti Spiritus, Villa Clara, Matanzas, and Havana * Andros Island, Bimini and Grand Bahama

A Hurricane Watch is in effect for... * North of Fernandina Beach to Edisto Beach * West of the Aucilla River to Indian Pass * Cuban provinces of Holguin and Las Tunas

A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for... * Cuban provinces of Holguin, Las Tunas

A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for... * North of Edisto Beach to South Santee River * West of Indian Pass to the Okaloosa/Walton County Line

A Storm Surge Warning means there is a danger of life-threatening inundation, from rising water moving inland from the coastline, during the next 36 hours in the indicated locations. For a depiction of areas at risk, please see the National Weather Service Storm Surge Watch/Warning Graphic, available at hurricanes.gov. This is a life-threatening situation. Persons located within these areas should take all necessary actions to protect life and property from rising water and the potential for other dangerous conditions. Promptly follow evacuation and other instructions from local officials.

A Storm Surge Watch means there is a possibility of life- threatening inundation, from rising water moving inland from the coastline, in the indicated locations during the next 48 hours. For a depiction of areas at risk, please see the National Weather Service Storm Surge Watch/Warning Graphic, available at hurricanes.gov.

A Hurricane Warning means that hurricane conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area. Preparations to protect life and property should be rushed to completion.

A Hurricane Watch means that hurricane conditions are possible within the watch area. A watch is typically issued 48 hours before the anticipated first occurrence of tropical-storm-force winds, conditions that make outside preparations difficult or dangerous.

A Tropical Storm Warning means that tropical storm conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area.

A Tropical Storm Watch means that tropical storm conditions are possible within the watch area, generally within 48 hours.

Interests elsewhere in Cuba and the southeastern United States should monitor the progress of Irma.

For storm information specific to your area in the United States, including possible inland watches and warnings, please monitor products issued by your local National Weather Service forecast office. For storm information specific to your area outside the United States, please monitor products issued by your national meteorological service.

DISCUSSION AND 48-HOUR OUTLOOK ------------------------------ At 200 PM EDT (1800 UTC), the eye of Hurricane Irma was located by radar near latitude 23.1 North, longitude 80.2 West. Irma is moving just north of due west along the north coast of Cuba at near 9 mph (15 km/h). A northwest motion is expected to begin later today with a turn toward the north-northwest on Sunday. On the forecast track, the core of Irma will continue to move near or over the north coast of Cuba this afternoon, and will reach the Florida Keys Sunday morning. The hurricane is expected to move along or near the southwest coast of Florida Sunday afternoon.

Maximum sustained winds are near 125 mph (205 km/h) with higher gusts. Irma is a category 3 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Irma is forecast to restrengthen once it moves away from Cuba, and Irma is expected to remain a powerful hurricane as it approaches Florida. A NOAA plane is airborne en route to investigate Irma.

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 70 miles (110 km) from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 195 miles (315 km).

The estimated minimum central pressure is 941 mb (27.79 inches).

HAZARDS AFFECTING LAND ---------------------- STORM SURGE: The combination of a dangerous storm surge and the tide will cause normally dry areas near the coast to be flooded by rising waters moving inland from the shoreline. The water is expected to reach the following HEIGHTS ABOVE GROUND if the peak surge occurs at the time of high tide...

Cape Sable to Captiva...10 to 15 ft Captiva to Ana Maria Island...6 to 10 ft Card Sound Bridge through Cape Sable, including the Florida Keys...5 to 10 ft Ana Maria Island to Clearwater Beach, including Tampa Bay...5 to 8 ft North Miami Beach to Card Sound Bridge, including Biscayne Bay...4 to 6 ft Isle of Palms, South Carolina to Fernandina Beach...4 to 6 ft Clearwater Beach to Ochlockonee River...4 to 6 ft Fernandina Beach to North Miami Beach...2 to 4 ft

The deepest water will occur along the immediate coast in areas of onshore winds, where the surge will be accompanied by large and destructive waves. Surge-related flooding depends on the relative timing of the surge and the tidal cycle, and can vary greatly over short distances. For information specific to your area, please see products issued by your local National Weather Service forecast office.

The combination of a life-threatening storm surge and large breaking waves will raise water levels ABOVE NORMAL TIDE LEVELS by the following amounts within the hurricane warning area near and to the north of the center of Irma. Near the coast, the surge will be accompanied by large and destructive waves.

Northwestern Bahamas...3 to 6 ft Northern coast of Cuba in the warning area...5 to 10 ft

WIND: Hurricane conditions are expected to continue within the hurricane warning area along the north coast of Cuba through today. Hurricane conditions are expected in portions of the northwestern Bahamas today, and in portions of the Florida peninsula and the Florida Keys tonight and Sunday.

Hurricane and tropical storm conditions are possible within the watch area on Sunday.

RAINFALL: Irma is expected to produce the following rain accumulations through Wednesday:

Northern Cuba...10 to 15 inches, isolated 20 inches. Southern Cuba...5 to 10 inches, isolated 15 inches. Western Bahamas...3 to 6 inches, isolated 10 inches. The Florida Keys...10 to 20 inches, isolated 25 inches. The Florida peninsula and southeast Georgia...8 to 15 inches, isolated 20 inches. The eastern Florida Panhandle...3 to 6 inches, isolated 8 inches. Rest of eastern Georgia, western South Carolina, and western North Carolina...4 to 8 inches. Western Georgia, eastern and northern Alabama, and southern Tennessee...2 to 5 inches. In all areas this rainfall may cause life-threatening flash floods and, in some areas, mudslides.

TORNADOES: A few tornadoes are possible today and tonight over southern Florida.

SURF: Swells generated by Irma are affecting the southeastern Bahamas, the Turks and Caicos Islands and the southeast coast of the United States today. These swells are likely to cause life- threatening surf and rip current conditions. Please consult products from your local weather office.

NEXT ADVISORY ------------- Next complete advisory at 500 PM EDT.

Isle of Palms Is the Coastal Getaway of the Summer

The South Carolina barrier island just 30 minutes from Charleston may just be the area’s best-kept secret.Swaths of uninterrupted white-sand beach, the smell of salty spray, warm sun on your skin, and the rustle of palm fronds gently blowing in the wind—these are the sights, sounds, and scents of Isle of Palms. The South Carolina barrier ...

The South Carolina barrier island just 30 minutes from Charleston may just be the area’s best-kept secret.

Swaths of uninterrupted white-sand beach, the smell of salty spray, warm sun on your skin, and the rustle of palm fronds gently blowing in the wind—these are the sights, sounds, and scents of Isle of Palms. The South Carolina barrier island packs a lot of relaxation and big fun into a vacation destination that's just seven miles long and one mile wide. The island's proximity to Charleston (just 18 miles by car), make it a preferred summer hideout for locals. An abundance of vacation rentals and the iconic Wild Dunes resort have been drawing visitors from across the country since the early 1970s.

With the deep blue Atlantic on one side and marshy creeks of the Intracoastal Waterway on the other, Isle of Palms offers the best of the Lowcountry and the beach in one stunning setting that's begging to be added to your vacation calendar.

Six of Isle of Palms' seven total miles are occupied by public beaches, which means you'll have your pick of the litter when looking for a sandy spot where you can post up for the day—or the week. Once you've staked your claim, all the normal beach activities are yours for the choosing, from splashing around in the surprisingly calm seas to building the ultimate sandcastle or playing a game of beach volleyball. For families, the Isle of Palms County Park, located in the middle of the island's coastline, is ideal. The public beach has lifeguards, outdoor showers, chair and umbrella rentals, restrooms, and even a playground for little ones retreat to once they tire of the sun and surf.

Make the most of a visit to Isle of Palms by scheduling a charter to take you offshore. Get your sea legs at the Isle of Palms Marina, where you can easily rent a boat and spend a day exploring the island's bays and waterways. Fishing charters are plentiful and offer both reef fishing and Gulf Stream fishing. For adventure enthusiasts or wildlife lovers, Barrier Island Eco Tours hosts a range of naturalist-guided tours that take visitors through winding salt marshes, tidal creeks, and the Intracoastal Waterway on the way to uninhabited Capers Island. Animals you might see along the way include loggerhead turtles, bottlenose dolphins, and every shape and size of coastal birds.

Breakfast is noteworthy at Sea Biscuit Café. The tiny beachside shack has been dishing out delicious morning meals since 1968. While they offer all the classics, the daily specials are where the magic happens. Past offerings have included chocolate banana challah French toast, lemon lavender pancakes, and tomato pie.

When you need a mid-day refuel for the whole family, Coconut Joe's is the obvious choice. Located on Isle of Palms' main drag, you won't have to venture far to get fresh seafood and impeccable vibes. The open-air covered deck is the ideal spot for munching on the restaurant's namesake shrimp, while rocking sandy toes and sun-bleached hair. When happy hour hits, venture to the rooftop bar for a frozen cocktail or painkiller. Nothing will put you on island time faster.

By the time you're finally ready to come in from the sun and go out to dinner, Isle of Palms will be waiting with plenty of options. The Boathouse and Acme Lowcountry Kitchen are island staples that have stood the test of time thanks to excellent quality food and good old-fashioned Southern hospitality. For a special night out, try Coda del Pesce, a fine dining restaurant that specializes in Italian with lots of influence (and fresh catch) from the nearby seas.

All trips to Isle of Palms must include at least one visit to The Windjammer at Front Beach. The legendary local music venue is known for its incredible live shows, stellar views of the water, cold drinks, and unbeatable fried pickles.

The obvious choice for places to stay in Isle of Palms is Wild Dunes Resort, a 1,600-acre family-friendly resort that offers everything from rooms and suites at two inns, to private beach condos and home rentals. In addition to a more-than-comfortable stay, the resort also features several resort-style pools, a spa, and two championship golf courses.

If you're hoping for a cozier stay, the newly renovated Palms Oceanfront Hotel consists of 68 modern rooms with gorgeous views of the sparkling Atlantic. There are also plenty of rentals through Airbnb and VRBO for everything from multifamily waterfront homes to one-bedroom condos.

Whether you book for a long weekend or stay for an entire week, the memories and magic of Isle of Palms will stay with you for months and years to come—maybe even until you have a chance to make another trip back!

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