Tree Servicein Goose Creek, SC

Let's Talk!

What Clients Say About Us

Eco-Responsible Tree Removal in Goose Creek, SC

We have removed thousands of trees over the years. However, we never recommend tree removal if it's not warranted. Some South Carolina tree service companies tend to remove trees when they should be saved or simply pruned. Others go the opposite direction and never recommend tree removal.

Unlike other companies, our arborists make educated recommendations based on experience, your trees, and your needs. We make the right call for you - not for us. If disease, destruction of foundation, or other circumstances necessitate tree removal, rest assured we're recommending it for a reason.

Your Premier Tree Service Company in South Carolina

With years of experience, it's no wonder why so many South Carolina natives choose Palmetto Tree Service over the competition. Clients love us because we exceed expectations with a smile - no if's, and's, or but's.

Our commitment to superior service isn't a gimmick; it's a year-round promise. When you choose Palmetto Tree, you'll benefit from:

  • Professional advice and expertise
  • Seasoned, friendly, hardworking tree care experts
  • Efficient, effective tree care services
  • Competitive pricing

Ready to get started? We're ready to help! Give us a call to learn more about our tree care services and to schedule your first appointment today.

Physical-therapy-phone-number843-345-0579

Free Consultation

Latest News in Goose Creek, SC

Lack of resources for children with autism causing parents stress

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - Parents of children with disabilities say they are struggling to find adequate resources, such as daycare and therapy for their children across the state.Jamie Carter is a parent of a 5-year-old with borderline autism. She says her son has not had the therapy he has been prescribed since November due to a lack of available resources and short staffing of certified therapists. She says he switched therapists four times within six months because they will quit.She says she is had trouble finding ...

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - Parents of children with disabilities say they are struggling to find adequate resources, such as daycare and therapy for their children across the state.

Jamie Carter is a parent of a 5-year-old with borderline autism. She says her son has not had the therapy he has been prescribed since November due to a lack of available resources and short staffing of certified therapists. She says he switched therapists four times within six months because they will quit.

She says she is had trouble finding a daycare that will take her son because he is not potty-trained, regardless of his disability.

“It’s just been frustrating finding daycare, finding ABA therapy, because he’ll start with a therapist, they quit,” Carter said. “He went through four therapists in six months because they would turn over. So, the agencies aren’t able to keep people employed. You know, just consistency.”

Carter says the company she has been with consistently to support her son is discontinuing its services for autistic children next month. They had been providing help with learning and applied behavior analysis therapy. Now she says she does not know what to do.

“By the grace of God, I do set my own schedule,” Carter said. “So, I’m thinking about the poor mom who has to go work at a dentist’s office or wherever that doesn’t have that luxury. What is she doing with her kid? You know, because daycares aren’t going to take them.”

Able S.C. is a disability-run and led organization that helps foster inclusion in communities by providing adequate resources for people with disabilities across the state.

Mary Alex Kopp, director of public relations and special events for Able S.C., says this sort of issue comes from a lack of funding and not having enough people certified to work with these kids.

“Funding, funding, funding,” Kopp said. “Lack of adequate funding is the reason why things slow down, why they don’t move quickly. And when we have more adequate and appropriate funding, people have better access to two services, and that includes people with disabilities seeking those particular services.”

Kopp says a disability is not something to fix because there is nothing wrong with the person. She says parents just need to find their child the right place for guidance.

“Parents should feel that they have the right to seek the same resources as parents of children who do not have disabilities,” Kopp said. “And that’s kind of our main thing here at Able is while like certainly seeking very specified services that you need, that your child needs for their disability, it’s just as important to ensure that you were seeking services for your child to participate in that don’t necessarily, that aren’t necessarily disability exclusive.”

Able S.C. says Family Connection of South Carolina, South Carolina Partnerships for Inclusion, Federation of Families and the United Way 211 number are great resources for parents to contact if they need help for a child with disabilities. They can help with services from early intervention to parenting.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Minority leader positions at risk on the Berkeley Co. School Board

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - The Berkeley County School Board could face difficulty with representation, re-election and diversity for this upcoming election season.That is according to the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Goose Creek branch.A new law passed back in May called S910 will force two of the school board’s minority leaders to run against each other due to redistricting.School board members, educators, pastors and members of the Berkeley County community raise concerns at the Goos...

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - The Berkeley County School Board could face difficulty with representation, re-election and diversity for this upcoming election season.

That is according to the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Goose Creek branch.

A new law passed back in May called S910 will force two of the school board’s minority leaders to run against each other due to redistricting.

School board members, educators, pastors and members of the Berkeley County community raise concerns at the Goose Creek NAACP emergency meeting about how this will affect Berkeley County School Board elections.

Reverend Nelson B. Rivers III, the pastor of Charity Missionary Baptist Church, says he wants to stay away from the political aspect and focus on doing what is right for the educators and students.

“We have to speak truth to power,” Rivers said. “Without worrying about whether it’s political. This is not politics. It has a political outcome, but this is not politics.”

David Barrow, the board chair for Berkeley County School District, says the board did not work closely with the lawmakers who passed this bill. He says the majority of the board does not support the changes.

“The current chair rejects this,” Barrow said. “Never have supported this because it’s wrong, and it’s not fair to the other members, and it’s against our policy.”

Barrow also says under the new law, leaders in odd-numbered districts elected in 2020 will have to run again this November and again in 2024. Those in even-numbered districts will keep their original four-year term without re-election.

Sharina Haynes, president of the NAACP Goose Creek branch, says they want the community to stay informed.

“I just want to encourage the community to know about the bills that are coming in through our Senate and House,” Haynes said. “Making sure that we have a voice and making sure that we are holding our elected officials accountable.”

She also wants people to realize how important this state law is when voting this year.

“You know, everyone focuses on the federal level, but state laws and state elections, those are the things that have so much impact on our communities, and it’s so important for us to keep engaged even in the midst of a pandemic,” Haynes said.

The Goose Creek NAACP branch says they fully support the BCSD school board’s stance on this issue. They also say they encourage everyone to attend the BCSD board meeting on July 26 to get involved and stay informed.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Goose Creek NAACP concerned over law that could impact school board

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCBD) – The Goose Creek Chapter of the NAACP is expressing concerns about a new state law that could impact the Berkeley County School Board.Bill S910 says the Berkeley County School Board should have nine members, of which eight should be elected from single-member districts where they reside, while one member should be elected from the county at large.Board members ...

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCBD) – The Goose Creek Chapter of the NAACP is expressing concerns about a new state law that could impact the Berkeley County School Board.

Bill S910 says the Berkeley County School Board should have nine members, of which eight should be elected from single-member districts where they reside, while one member should be elected from the county at large.

Board members previously expressed their concern over the new law. Now, the Goose Creek NAACP said they are planning to hold a public meeting to address the same concerns.

“Bill S910 has been passed through the Senate and House with minimum community input, and we’re concerned that the community that it will affect doesn’t know the ramifications of the bill,” said Sharina Haynes, president, of the Goose Creek NAACP.

One of their main concerns is how the law, which was signed by Governor Henry McMaster this year, changes the makeup of the board.

“Eliminating a minority seat in addition to that will also include adding an at-large member. So we want the community to come out and let them know about what is happening with this bill, the ramifications of it, how we got here, and who got this passed.”

Haynes said the elimination of a minority seat also means two minority members of the board will have to run against each other in November. They are also concerned about how the law cuts in half the four-year term in which several board members were elected in 2020 since the new law required all members to run for re-election this year.

“We have members of the school board who were elected in November 2020 and with this new bill they will have their terms decreased from four years to two years,” said Haynes.

The school board is in the process of filing a lawsuit over the new law, and the Goose Creek NAACP says they believe that step may be needed since the law is already in effect.

That is why they plan to hold a public meeting in a week and a half. “And let everyone know that there are some ramifications that will affect your children with the passing of this S910 bill.”

That meeting will take place on Saturday, July 9.

Commentary: Wind energy industry can help support SC communities in need

All over the United States, communities like Georgetown are in the midst of a historic transition away from coal and toward clean energy. The Winyah coal plant, which dates back to the 1970s, is expected to close this decade. The shutdown has already started, with parts of the plant idled and a fraction of the workforce still needed to run the facility.This change raises the question: What happens to workers and communities as these plants close and the economic benefits these facilities provide go away?One potential answer for...

All over the United States, communities like Georgetown are in the midst of a historic transition away from coal and toward clean energy. The Winyah coal plant, which dates back to the 1970s, is expected to close this decade. The shutdown has already started, with parts of the plant idled and a fraction of the workforce still needed to run the facility.

This change raises the question: What happens to workers and communities as these plants close and the economic benefits these facilities provide go away?

One potential answer for the Georgetown community could be in the recently passed offshore wind industry resolution (H.4831). A big thank you is in order to state Rep. Jason Elliott, R-Greenville, and everyone who helped get this legislation to Gov. Henry McMaster’s desk. Who knew an Upstate legislator so far from the coast would have such a keen interest in offshore wind?

H.4831 provides exactly the type of economic development we need to pursue for areas such as Georgetown.

It instructs the Department of Commerce to identify the benefits of expanding South Carolina’s offshore wind supply chain industry. The study and the roadmap it creates will mean attracting new companies and expanding existing companies that build the components needed for offshore wind: the turbine towers, blades, cables and more. While there are many possibilities for the future of Georgetown’s economy after coal, measures like this could help provide high-quality jobs in clean energy that can help fill the void left by the closure of the Winyah coal facility.

Georgetown has a long history as an industry town, and creating opportunities in emerging technologies such as wind could be just what’s needed to help our community grow in a sustainable way.

Our community is no stranger to the boom-and-bust cycle of industry, as evidenced by the ups and downs of the steel mill over the years. I believe that the wind industry can provide a stable foundation to grow South Carolina’s economy and provide continued prosperity to communities like Georgetown.

The offshore wind industry in the United States is expected to skyrocket over the next decade, with new projects expected to meet the lofty federal goal of 30 gigawatts of offshore wind deployment by 2030. Offshore wind also offers some of the highest-paying jobs in clean energy, with a median hourly wage well above the national average.

Our state has seen these economic benefits firsthand: The recently expanded Nexans subsea cable manufacturer created more than 200 jobs with its expanded facility in Goose Creek. As a coastal town with a long industrial background, Georgetown is ripe for similar opportunities in the offshore wind industry.

I hope the momentum from this legislation’s passage and the results of the study inspire my fellow lawmakers to look for other ways to capitalize on the growing wind energy industry and a new clean energy economy. Thinking outside the box is essential to developing creative solutions that provide new avenues for growth for Georgetown and many others across the state.

As the long legacy of coal power comes to a close, it’s important that we are proactive in finding new ways for our communities to prosper.

S.C. Sen. Ronnie A. Sabb represents District 32, which includes parts of Berkeley, Florence, Georgetown, Horry and Williamsburg counties.

Get a weekly recap of South Carolina opinion and analysis from The Post and Courier in your inbox on Monday evenings.

DuPont opens SC medical device plant in Berkeley County

DuPont marked the opening of a new biopharmaceutical plant near Moncks Corner that will expand the chemical conglomerate’s production of flexible tubing for the medical industry.The Liveo Healthcare Solutions manufacturing factory at the Charleston International Manufacturing Center near Moncks Corner employs 25 workers and is expected to double that number by mid-2024, according to Bill Alexander, site leader.The tubing that will be produced at the Berkeley County plant near the Cooper River can be used in medical device...

DuPont marked the opening of a new biopharmaceutical plant near Moncks Corner that will expand the chemical conglomerate’s production of flexible tubing for the medical industry.

The Liveo Healthcare Solutions manufacturing factory at the Charleston International Manufacturing Center near Moncks Corner employs 25 workers and is expected to double that number by mid-2024, according to Bill Alexander, site leader.

The tubing that will be produced at the Berkeley County plant near the Cooper River can be used in medical devices such as catheters and intravenous bags.

The facility is on property that DuPont originally purchased in 1970. It joins a sister plant in Hemlock, Mich.

DuPont previously said it spent about $66 million to reopen the empty factory in Goose Creek, which previously produced the company’s Kevlar-branded high-strength fabric used in bulletproof vests.

“The Cooper River site will bring additional production capacity online over the next two years to serve strategic customers and expand our Liveo Healthcare Solutions customer base,” Eugene Toccalino, global business director for DuPont’s health care and specialty lubricants division, said in a written statement. “We’re committed to investing in our healthcare business, and this biopharma processing manufacturing investment ... is a key milestone in our growth strategy that will help us offer a highly reliable and sustainable product supply.”

DuPont said it worked with local companies, including more than 40 subcontractors, on the expansion project. Gov. Henry McMaster and DuPont officials joined local government leaders in the July 28 ribbon-cutting.

In addition to the Cooper River expansion, DuPont said it will add silicone tubing capacity in China during the second half of this year to meet growing needs in Asia.

Wilmington, Del.-based DuPont arrived in the Charleston region more than half a century ago, when it bought about 2,100 acres at the end of Cypress Garden Road in 1970.

Several years went by before it unveiled plans for a large manufacturing plant on 275 acres, where about 1,500 workers made a new variety of polyester called Dacron. The $266 million investment covered an area the size of seven football fields.

But even before it was completed, the factory was already in trouble as the global market for synthetic fibers was becoming oversaturated. Also, polyester clothing began to fall out of fashion, and low-wage overseas rivals were able to sell the material at cheaper prices.

DuPont eventually sold the Dacron business, but it also plowed money into other product lines in Berkeley County. A $167 million plant making resins under the Hytrel and Castrin brands was announced in 1997. DuPont announced in February that it is selling that division to Irving, Texas-based Celanese Corp. in a deal that’s expected to close by the end of the year.

The company also shelled out $500 million to build its Kevlar plant in Berkeley County, but it shut the operation down after about six years because demand for the material fell well short of expectations.

Our twice-weekly newsletter features all the business stories shaping Charleston and South Carolina. Get ahead with us - it’s free.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.