Tree Servicein Charleston, SC

Let's Talk!

What Clients Say About Us

Eco-Responsible Tree Removal in Charleston, SC

We have removed thousands of trees over the years. However, we never recommend tree removal if it's not warranted. Some South Carolina tree service companies tend to remove trees when they should be saved or simply pruned. Others go the opposite direction and never recommend tree removal.

Unlike other companies, our arborists make educated recommendations based on experience, your trees, and your needs. We make the right call for you - not for us. If disease, destruction of foundation, or other circumstances necessitate tree removal, rest assured we're recommending it for a reason.

Your Premier Tree Service Company in South Carolina

With years of experience, it's no wonder why so many South Carolina natives choose Palmetto Tree Service over the competition. Clients love us because we exceed expectations with a smile - no if's, and's, or but's.

Our commitment to superior service isn't a gimmick; it's a year-round promise. When you choose Palmetto Tree, you'll benefit from:

  • Professional advice and expertise
  • Seasoned, friendly, hardworking tree care experts
  • Efficient, effective tree care services
  • Competitive pricing

Ready to get started? We're ready to help! Give us a call to learn more about our tree care services and to schedule your first appointment today.

Physical-therapy-phone-number843-345-0579

Free Consultation

Latest News in Charleston, SC

A First Look at Dark and Moody Oyster Bar the Quinte, Premiering in Charleston Today

Charleston’sCharleston’s newest oyster bar the Quinte (36 George Street) opens today, November 18, at 11 a.m. The most recent bivalve restaurant on the scene comes from Philadelphia-based hospitality company Method Co., which runs the connected boutique hotel the Pinch. Method Co. is known for its luxury details ...

Charleston’sCharleston’s newest oyster bar the Quinte (36 George Street) opens today, November 18, at 11 a.m. The most recent bivalve restaurant on the scene comes from Philadelphia-based hospitality company Method Co., which runs the connected boutique hotel the Pinch. Method Co. is known for its luxury details and attention to branding in all its projects, which for the Quinte, means a seductive Paris-meets-old-New-York interior with a menu full of hyper-local seafood.

The team named the establishment after the original billiards hall that opened in the George Street location in 1918, but the chef’s surname couldn’t be any closer. Chef Nicolas Quintero (formerly of Zero George, FIG, and the Ordinary) runs the kitchen. The menu is tight, but it hits the highlights one would expect from an oyster bar — from seafood towers to shrimp rolls to caviar service. Quintero says, “We want the Quinte to be an elevated oyster bar that feels very comfortable and welcoming. I believe in using a lot of local purveyors and keeping the menu as seasonal as possible, but also with fermented items to be a note to the past. Right now, we have a green tomato and Asian pear mignonette with mushrooms that we pickled last summer.”

When asked what separates the Quinte from other Charleston oyster bars, Quintero says, “Everybody has their own kind of successful formula for them, and we’re trying to develop something that’s our own. We want to be the best version of ourselves.”

Katelyn Kupiec, general manager of the Quinte (formerly of Husk Charleston and Nashville) also leads the beverage menu and says that for the most part, the drinks stay in the clear liquor lane with wines from the coastal Mediterranean region “We want our drinks to pair with our food options, but offer something for everyone, even if it’s not an obvious choice,” she says.

The Quinte can seat 41 customers with a very handsome bar, European cafe seating, and two large booth-style tables. Method Co. has obsessed over the design, lighting, and music to create a dark, moody, and transportive vibe — one can imagine how it may have felt to be in the original billiards bar at the address.

Kupiec says, “This feels like this place that should already have existed in Charleston. And it maybe didn’t. But here it is. It feels lived in. It feels like we’ve already been in this space already for years.”

Take a look around the Quinte here, and peruse the menu before the official opening at 11 a.m.

CHARLESTON 74, COLORADO STATE 64

FG FT Reb COLORADO ST. Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Moors 18 2-5 2-3 1-3 1 1 6 Hebb 14 3-5 0-0 0-1 1 3 7 Lake 23 2-7 0-0 0-5 2 1 ...

FG FT Reb
COLORADO ST. Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS
Moors 18 2-5 2-3 1-3 1 1 6
Hebb 14 3-5 0-0 0-1 1 3 7
Lake 23 2-7 0-0 0-5 2 1 4
Rivera 32 6-11 2-4 1-5 1 1 15
Tonje 29 4-8 0-0 1-7 0 4 9
Jackson 26 4-6 0-2 1-3 5 4 8
Strong 22 1-7 0-0 1-2 0 1 3
Cartier 21 3-8 0-0 1-3 2 3 6
Palmer 15 3-4 0-0 1-4 2 1 6
Totals 200 28-61 4-9 7-33 14 19 64

Percentages: FG .459, FT .444.

3-Point Goals: 4-16, .250 (Rivera 1-1, Hebb 1-2, Tonje 1-3, Strong 1-5, Jackson 0-1, Lake 0-4).

Team Rebounds: 2. Team Turnovers: None.

Blocked Shots: None.

Turnovers: 15 (Jackson 3, Cartier 2, Lake 2, Palmer 2, Strong 2, Hebb, Moors, Rivera, Tonje).

Steals: 5 (Hebb, Jackson, Lake, Palmer, Rivera).

Technical Fouls: None.

FG FT Reb
COLL. OF CHARLESTON Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS
Lampten 6 0-0 0-0 0-1 0 2 0
Bolon 20 1-10 0-0 1-5 1 1 2
Larson 27 4-9 0-0 0-5 1 1 10
Scott 27 3-6 6-7 2-4 2 1 12
Smith 24 2-9 5-5 1-3 1 1 11
Horton 24 3-4 2-2 0-1 0 3 11
Robinson 23 5-10 0-0 0-3 1 0 11
Faye 21 1-3 6-6 3-8 2 3 8
Burnham 15 1-4 0-0 0-2 0 2 2
Brzovic 13 2-4 3-5 4-6 1 2 7
Totals 200 22-59 22-25 11-38 9 16 74

Percentages: FG .373, FT .880.

3-Point Goals: 8-32, .250 (Horton 3-4, Larson 2-6, Smith 2-8, Robinson 1-3, Brzovic 0-1, Faye 0-1, Burnham 0-2, Scott 0-2, Bolon 0-5).

Team Rebounds: 3. Team Turnovers: 2.

Blocked Shots: 4 (Horton 2, Faye, Scott).

Turnovers: 11 (Scott 4, Horton 2, Larson 2, Bolon, Faye, Smith).

Steals: 7 (Larson 2, Bolon, Faye, Lampten, Robinson, Scott).

Technical Fouls: None.

Editorial: There’s an easy way for Charleston Coalition for Kids to regain its influence

The first time the Charleston Coalition for Kids got involved in the county school board elections, all four candidates it endorsed were elected.Two years later, in 2020, just two of its five candidates were elected. Two were elected again this year, but all nine seats were on the ballot this time around. So its success rate over three cycles has dropped from 100% to 40% to now 22%.Now, it’s possible that voters just don’t agree with the coalition’s preferences for candidates and policies, and they’ve tu...

The first time the Charleston Coalition for Kids got involved in the county school board elections, all four candidates it endorsed were elected.

Two years later, in 2020, just two of its five candidates were elected. Two were elected again this year, but all nine seats were on the ballot this time around. So its success rate over three cycles has dropped from 100% to 40% to now 22%.

Now, it’s possible that voters just don’t agree with the coalition’s preferences for candidates and policies, and they’ve turned away from the candidates as they’ve become more familiar with the coalition’s policies over the past six years. We share many of the organization’s values and goals, and only four of the nine candidates we endorsed won — although one winner had unofficially withdrawn, so we didn’t consider endorsing her.

But we suspect the meteoric drop of the coalition’s political influence goes beyond that. It seems more likely that voters have been turned off by the coalition’s secrecy — which critics have done an excellent job of exploiting.

It’s true that one of the reasons so-called dark money groups are so reviled by reform groups is that they’re so incredibly successful. But those groups also tend to play on the federal level, where their divisive messages are reinforced around the clock by the partisan cable TV channels that brainwash voters on the right and left into an often nonsensical orthodoxy. The Coalition for Kids is by all appearances a purely local organization that has some political influence at the state level but that confines its electioneering to school board races in a single county.

The sort of backlash that we’re apparently seeing against the coalition is precisely what we’d love to see against most dark-money organizations — because most dark-money organizations are not rooted in and working to improve their communities. The most insidious ones have deceptive names and mislead us about their goals — if they even pretend to tell us their goals.

The coalition, on the other hand, was founded by such local business heavyweights as Anita Zucker and Ben Navarro and counts among its most visible supporters former Charleston Mayor Joe Riley.

And it has been quite straightforward about its goals: It wants to close the achievement gap that dogs Charleston County schools. In order to do that, it supports early childhood education, more autonomy for principals, better pay for teachers, increased transparency and accountability in the schools. And it believes one way to help achieve those goals is through the expansion of the public-school choice programs that have allowed Charleston County schools to retain the support of so many upper-income parents who have abandoned many S.C. school districts.

Critics call this privatization, which is at best misleading since all the efforts the coalition has supported leave the school district firmly in control of the schools that receive public funding, and which we would be among the first to oppose — if that were what the group were actually pushing. But that’s an argument that plays well among teachers and on the political left. Meantime, those on the political right realize that this isn’t the kind of “privatization” their lobbying groups want — the kind that sends tax dollars to private schools that don’t have to answer to the school district, much less the taxpayers.

Where critics are right is in demanding the same sort of transparency from the Coalition for Kids that the coalition rightly wants from the school district: It should tell us who’s paying for its campaign efforts. Is it primarily Mr. Navarro, as many people suspect? How many of its funders are among the list of 75 prominent founding members it announced so proudly in 2018 — only to scrub from its website after people started criticizing its first advertising campaign?

Given the agenda that it continues to pursue, we can’t imagine that it’s funded by the anti-public school crowd that backs private-school-choice efforts, but as long as the names are hidden, people have every right to believe otherwise.

Of course, the coalition wouldn’t be able to hide its donors if South Carolina wasn’t one of just three states that allow outside groups to spend money to influence our votes without telling us anything about who they are or what they’re doing.

State legislators argue ridiculously that the U.S. Constitution bars them from requiring organizations that try to influence our votes to identify their donors, which is nearly the opposite of what the U.S. Supreme Court has said. The court has indeed said we can’t limit how much money organizations and individuals spend on political campaigns. But it also has said there’s no need to worry that unlimited election spending will create corruption precisely because the spending is reported. And no less a conservative icon than the late Justice Antonin Scalia has written that “Requiring people to stand up in public for their political acts fosters civic courage, without which democracy is doomed.”

The Legislature needs to close the S.C. dark money loophole next year — not because the Coalition for Kids is exploiting it but because requiring people to tell us when they’re spending money to influence our vote is, as Justice Scalia noted, essential to the survival of our republic. The Coalition for Kids needs to identify its donors, with or without a law, because it’s the right thing to do — and because it’s essential to any hopes the coalition has for advancing its important agenda.

2 South Carolina Cities Named Among The Best Small Cities In America

Two South Carolina cities are getting praise for being among of the best small cities in America.Condé Nast Traveler recently released its 2022 Readers' Choice Awards list for the best small cities around the country, and two towns in South Carolina managed to snag spots on the list. According to the site, "enthusiasm for travel has never been higher," with nearly 250,000 readers responded to the survey to choose their choices...

Two South Carolina cities are getting praise for being among of the best small cities in America.

Condé Nast Traveler recently released its 2022 Readers' Choice Awards list for the best small cities around the country, and two towns in South Carolina managed to snag spots on the list. According to the site, "enthusiasm for travel has never been higher," with nearly 250,000 readers responded to the survey to choose their choices for best small and big cities.

So which South Carolina cities were chosen as two of the best small cities in the America?

Charleston and Greenville

While Greenville ranked No. 6 overall on the list, an incredible accomplishment in its own right with the competition it faced, Charleston managed to grab the top spot on the list. Here's what Condé Nast Traveler had to say:

"Charleston may be a small town, but this city punches well above its weight. When you consider everything it has to offer — history, culture, food, charm — it's no wonder the so-called Holy City has repeatedly topped our list of the best small cities in the U.S. While its robust F&B scene, which includes a steady annual circuit of nationally recognized food and culture festivals, continues to be a draw, visitors are rarely prepared for the city's good looks. Stately homes, cobblestone streets, waterfront views, and an abundance of flowering window boxes only add to its welcoming vibe."
"Plan a trip to Greenville now and you. might see it just on the cusp of stardom. The food lover's town has a farm-to-table scene that continues to rise in the ranks (try Jianna for Italian and freshly shucked oysters, and Vault & Vator, the city's first speakeasy, for a strong, well-crafted cocktail), and its craft beer scene is seeing a similar explosion. Paired with its dynamic urban spaces are abundant natural resources, including a 32-acre Falls Park, which runs through the middle of town, and the Swamp Rabbit bike trail — now at a whopping 22 miles and counting."

Here are the Top 10 cities readers voted as the best small cities in the U.S.:

Check out Condé Nast Traveler's full list to see the best cities, both big and small, around the country.

Lowcountry Christmas tree vendors increasing prices

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – Rising costs for fuel, irrigation and fertilizer are putting a strain on Christmas tree farms.Cardinal Farms has four locations to buy trees in the Lowcountry and says that they have had to charge more this year.“Anything that’s in the growing process has gotten more expensive. We have gone up on the prices of the trees, but still reasonable. We’ve had very few people so far who have questioned the price. They do notice that it is different than last year. No one has walked away...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – Rising costs for fuel, irrigation and fertilizer are putting a strain on Christmas tree farms.

Cardinal Farms has four locations to buy trees in the Lowcountry and says that they have had to charge more this year.

“Anything that’s in the growing process has gotten more expensive. We have gone up on the prices of the trees, but still reasonable. We’ve had very few people so far who have questioned the price. They do notice that it is different than last year. No one has walked away yet,” said Bill Parker, a salesman at the Paul Cantrell Boulevard location.

Boone Hall Plantation is raising the prices of its trees as well.

“The Christmas trees that we are getting from Virginia on Monday will be costing 10 to 15 percent more than in years past,” said Eric Hernandez, the Farm Manager for the plantation. “The trees are being cut on Friday and will be on sale here starting in one week.”

Prices are expected to be higher, but experts say that there will be a steady supply of trees.

“The good news is, anyone who wants a Christmas tree this year will be able to find one. But if you have a specific tree in mind that will make your holiday shine the brightest, we recommend shopping early to secure your ideal tree at the right price for your family,” said Jami Warner, the Executive Director of the American Christmas Tree Association (ACTA).

But, variety may be limited in some areas.

“In 2022, we expect to see robust consumer demand for artificial and live Christmas trees. While there may be enough trees for everyone who wants one, the options may be more limited. Our 2022 recommendation to consumers is straightforward: if you want a specific type, style, or size of tree, artificial or live, find it early,” said Warner.

To ensure that people get the best bang for their buck Parker suggests taking very good care of your tree to make it last longer.

“If you’re not going to put it up tonight put it in a bucket of water because Frasier Firs have a good longevity if you keep them in water,” said Parker.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.